Sony MDR-EX81 in-ear headphones review

Sony in-ear headphones, like the company's players (then still cassette), gave rise to a whole cult. Ten years ago, it was not uncommon for users to specifically buy Sony headphones to use them with a player from another brand. Today, against the background of the abundance of player models and the general low level of standard headphones, this practice does not look like something special, but then it spoke of the presence of a certain halo around these headphones, their special reputation. It consisted in many respects not in the high sound quality in general, but in the presence of a decent return at low frequencies. It often happened that people connected new headphones to their player and were surprised at the bass, which seemed to “come from nowhere”. For me, let’s say, the realization of the “Sony headphone effect” happened just during the second round of the Moscow “revolution”, so I had the warmest feelings for Sony headphones of the Fontopia series, and then Groove (I don’t even remember the models now). It is also worth remembering that inexpensive cassette and disc players, which accounted for the bulk of sales, were accompanied by overhead headphones, and not the best ones. Maybe my vision here is too rosy and subjective, but for some time in-ear headphones were even perceived as more “prestigious” and were generally more expensive than mid-range over-ear headphones.

At the same time, Sony acted as the main innovator, at least in those models that were presented on the Russian market. Her headphones were the first to receive a shape more appropriate to the anatomical features of the ear, a special Groove sound channel (a kind of prototype of the subsequent insulator). It was also the Sony headphones that had an unbalanced cable that could be passed behind the head from the back of the head. It is possible that Sony was not a pioneer here, but it was the headphones of this company that were remembered.

Then there is a lull - the digital revolution, cassette players are finally gone, MiniDiscs are not sold well, CD-Walkman is at first unaffordable for the main mass of consumers, and then has to fight with MP3-CD players and eventually lose. Of course, the company still produces headphones, presents new models, but they are already being sold against the background of products from other companies active in Russia. Philips was especially distinguished in this regard (at least headphones of this particular brand were sold in almost every stall with pirated discs). At the same time, they could not boast of any outstanding sound, being strong middle peasants, but they took a fashionable (at that time) silver design and almost a dumping price.

Then, probably already in the year 2005, the era of in-ear headphones with a silicone insulator began (era is a loud word, but it describes what is happening well). They seriously differed from their usual counterparts in the level of isolation of ambient noise, the quality and volume of the sound and, quite expectedly, the level of return at low frequencies. The pioneer who prepared users for such headphones can be called the KOSS The Plug model. They were deprived of a full-fledged insulator, the ear canal was insulated with foamed polymer material, which gradually expanded after compression. But the headphones had the main thing: a relatively low price and an outstanding level of bass volume. It doesn't matter that the purists grimaced at the roaring and muffled bass with a minimum of accents. But the happy owners of The Plug could, spitting on all the precautions, turn on their favorite song at such a volume that their eyes began to itch from the inside. It was a definite success.

Over time, in-ear headphones with an isolator have filtered into almost all price segments and today they are no longer perceived as something new or exotic. Sony Ericsson in-ear headphones and headsets, attached to some models of Walkman series phones, played a significant role in this (they can also be purchased separately). Given the popularity of phones, a very large proportion of buyers of in-ear headphones with an isolator have already seen them with friends and acquaintances, which is worth a lot.

But back to Sony. In a period of decline in its own activity in the portable audio market and sluggish attempts to regain its former glory, Sony still continued to produce good headphones. One of these models was the MDR-EX71 headphones. They have a lot of fans, despite the fact that the EX71 is by no means without flaws. The picture, written by a decent sound and ease of use, is somewhat spoiled by a frankly unsuccessful cable: it strives to peel off after several months, “brightened” by our warm and friendly climate. Nevertheless, despite this, the EX71 is still selling well, especially since the price of these headphones has dropped below a thousand rubles.

In this material, we will not talk about the EX71, but about their successor or, rather, the successor of the idea, the MDR-EX81 model. These headphones at the heart of the design are all the same good old EX-71, only they were added to the behind-the-ears. Considering that, despite its popularity, the EX71 never made it to the editorial board, I think that a story about a newer model will be quite appropriate.

Body and design

The EX81 uses time-tested materials, in my opinion, in a very good combination - plastic and metal. Better, perhaps, only a combination of bronze with an old tree or cognac with coffee. In any case, in headphones, unlike the mass of various portable devices, metal is a rare guest. However, the more pleasant it is to see him. A tube is made of a metal alloy that connects the earhooks to the headphones themselves, a cable runs inside it. In addition to this purely utilitarian function, the tubes have one more: they act as the basis for the swivel mechanism. However, the mechanism is loudly said, it's just that the earpiece and handset are fastened in such a way as to ensure that the parts rotate relative to each other by a couple of millimeters in both directions. This little thing, as it seems at first glance, serves to make the headphones more comfortable to wear. It is no secret that we, although we are the happy owners of a pair of such important organs as ears, are all different, so additional freedom of maneuver does not hurt at all. Especially when it comes to wearing headphones for a long time, in the end, the fullness and quality of the sound depends on the angle of their entry into the ear canal, and this is perhaps the most important criterion.

The headphones themselves are quite compact in size, this is due to the relatively small diameter of the speaker. They are made of black plastic, equipped with a mandatory “chrome effect” insert to enhance the wow effect. >. This element could have been made less flashy, the design would never have suffered from this. An example, for example (I apologize for this dictionary construction), could be taken from the same metal tube, which has a noble smoky silver tint.

As far as the quality of workmanship is concerned, there are quite expectedly no complaints: nevertheless, in-ear headphones are so thin that they can be produced either completely without marriage, or not produced at all. Obviously, Sony and other eminent companies in this difficult field have chosen the first option.

I would rate the design of the EX81 as discreetly versatile, adult. Although the chrome insert, in my opinion, still spoils it a little. On the other hand, there are quite a few fans of catchy, even flashy design in our native sixth part of the land (just gouge-out style sweatpants are worth something), so it may well appeal to the less spoiled part of the population than the author.

Headphones are well suited to any style of clothing, very well combined with gadgets of different designs (tested on purple Sony E010 and red Cowon D2). No wonder in a podcast a couple of weeks ago I called them in a good everyday way. Looking ahead, I will say that the sound complements this image. Not in the sense that he is some kind of gray or everyday, but in that he does not require any kind of reverent listening to get the usual, simple buzz from music. The latter, being daily for many, fortunately, is never completely dulled. So, everyday life, in my opinion, is precisely expressed in the fact that you can just put on the headphones and go on business, brightening up your day (or night) with music. At the same time, you don’t need to worry too much about whether they will suit your appearance, or whether your current player is too bad for them.

Sound, usability

Here I, perhaps, will come from the rear and start with a story about the convenience of wearing headphones. For, coupled with a flashy chrome insert (well, it didn’t look to me, even if you crack), the nuances of wearing can spoil the overall impression of the EX81 for someone, or vice versa. In general, the situation with convenience is as follows: it takes a habit. I’ll try to reassure you a little: you won’t have to get used to it for a long time, and not everyone will have to get used to it for a long time. The fact is that after two and a half years of writing reviews, I feel the need to confess to you: I have small ears. Well, not really, of course, small, ordinary, and it’s a sin to complain, the owners of “locators”, I think, would be happy to change. But all kinds of behind-the-ears are not incompatible with my ears, but require a thoughtful selection of the attachment angle and other parameters when you just want to put on headphones and take off. Even the cool and expensive Audio-Technica EM-9d on-ears, with their vaunted spring-loaded and generally technically complex earpieces, took me quite a long time to adjust. A similar situation arose with the EX81. For the first time, forgetting about the previous misfortunes, I began to put them on on the go from the metro to the office, remembering that it would be nice to listen to the recently mined sample. To put on something they put on and even immediately started playing well, but the right earpiece strove to move relative to the desired position. The problem was partially corrected by the cable pulled out of the pocket for a long time, but the earhook was still clearly felt and led to constant fears that the earpiece would fly off.And so I rolled it around my ear for the entire seven or so minutes of walking along the third ring. On the way back, I decided to continue the execution and already internally prepared for further inconvenience, however, after putting on the headphones for the second time, I felt a “paradigm shift”. The earplugs have become more comfortable. Apparently, on the second attempt, they simply managed to catch the very right angle. After a dozen or two minutes, already in the subway, I realized that I forgot about the headphones, and in general they felt the same as those from wearing ordinary in-ear headphones. Bottom line: if you've been using over-the-ear headphones for any amount of time, then with the EX81, most likely, no roughness will arise at all. If not, you need to try on the headphones, and if you happen to buy without trying on, just try to be a little patient or change the angle. Well, if it’s not fate at all, as they say, come to our forum, in the Flea Market section.

In terms of sound, everything is much more boring. In short: he's good. True, if we end here, I'm afraid that my colleagues and the editor-in-chief will not understand me, not to mention those who read the material, that is, you. Therefore, I report in detail. Fans of Sony's sound will not be disappointed. Bass is present in the right volume, but the ears do not tear. If suddenly you don’t have enough of them, try slightly changing the angle of the earpiece in the channel or, in extreme cases, turn on the bass boost on the player (this is an extreme option, equalizers most often spoil the sound). With medium and high, in general, the order: the former are quite pleasant to the ear, and the latter do not cut the ears. By the way, about cutting. Unfortunately, you won't be able to get "ear-shattering" sound with the EX81. That is, the headphones are loud enough, but only for those who listen to music, say, in the range from 50 to 80 percent of the volume of a player with an average power audio path. Above, "wheezing" is already beginning, when the speaker, whose diameter is only 9 millimeters, begins to simply not withstand the input power. However, you should not be afraid of this, editorial players traditionally have a serious power reserve simply because they are used for various tests. Most conventional flash players are unlikely to overload the headphones. By the way, I can recommend them with a light heart as a "garnish" for the new playdrives of the parent company.

Conclusions and impressions

As a result, we have in-ear headphones with an unusual design, they stand out well from the general background and attract attention. Soft earhooks have an average level of comfort, you may need to "tweak the angle". The sound is expectedly good, but there is not much power reserve. All other impressions are generally positive; to refresh them in memory, it is enough to re-read the two previous pieces of the review.

Sony MDR-EX81 in-ear headphones review

Sony in-ear headphones, like the company's players (then still cassette), gave rise to a whole cult. Ten years ago, it was not uncommon for users to specifically buy Sony headphones to use them with a player from another brand. Today, against the background of the abundance of player models and the general low level of standard headphones, this practice does not look like something special, but then it spoke of the presence of a certain halo around these headphones, their special reputation. It consisted in many respects not in the high sound quality in general, but in the presence of a decent return at low frequencies. It often happened that people connected new headphones to their player and were surprised at the bass, which seemed to “come from nowhere”. For me, let’s say, the realization of the “Sony headphone effect” happened just during the second round of the Moscow “revolution”, so I had the warmest feelings for Sony headphones of the Fontopia series, and then Groove (I don’t even remember the models now). It is also worth remembering that inexpensive cassette and disc players, which accounted for the bulk of sales, were accompanied by overhead headphones, and not the best ones. Maybe my vision here is too rosy and subjective, but for some time in-ear headphones were even perceived as more “prestigious” and were generally more expensive than mid-range over-ear headphones.

At the same time, Sony acted as the main innovator, at least in those models that were presented on the Russian market. Her headphones were the first to receive a shape more appropriate to the anatomical features of the ear, a special Groove sound channel (a kind of prototype of the subsequent insulator). It was also the Sony headphones that had an unbalanced cable that could be passed behind the head from the back of the head. It is possible that Sony was not a pioneer here, but it was the headphones of this company that were remembered.

Then there is a lull - the digital revolution, cassette players are finally gone, MiniDiscs are not sold well, CD-Walkman is at first unaffordable for the main mass of consumers, and then has to fight with MP3-CD players and eventually lose. Of course, the company still produces headphones, presents new models, but they are already being sold against the background of products from other companies active in Russia. Philips was especially distinguished in this regard (at least headphones of this particular brand were sold in almost every stall with pirated discs). At the same time, they could not boast of any outstanding sound, being strong middle peasants, but they took a fashionable (at that time) silver design and almost a dumping price.

Then, probably already in the year 2005, the era of in-ear headphones with a silicone insulator began (era is a loud word, but it describes what is happening well). They seriously differed from their usual counterparts in the level of isolation of ambient noise, the quality and loudness of the sound and, quite expectedly, the level of return at low frequencies. The pioneer who prepared users for such headphones can be called the KOSS The Plug model. They were deprived of a full-fledged insulator, the ear canal was insulated with foamed polymer material, which gradually expanded after compression. But the headphones had the main thing: a relatively low price and an outstanding level of bass volume. It doesn't matter that the purists grimaced at the roaring and muffled bass with a minimum of accents. But the happy owners of The Plug could, spitting on all the precautions, turn on their favorite song at such a volume that their eyes began to itch from the inside. It was a definite success.

Over time, in-ear headphones with an isolator have filtered into almost all price segments and today they are no longer perceived as something new or exotic. Sony Ericsson in-ear headphones and headsets, which are attached to some models of Walkman series phones, played a significant role in this (they can also be purchased separately). Given the popularity of phones, a very large proportion of buyers of in-ear headphones with an isolator have already seen them with friends and acquaintances, which is worth a lot.

But back to Sony. In a period of decline in its own activity in the portable audio market and sluggish attempts to regain its former glory, Sony still continued to produce good headphones. One of these models was the MDR-EX71 headphones. They have a lot of fans, despite the fact that the EX71 is by no means without flaws. The picture, written by a decent sound and ease of use, is somewhat spoiled by a frankly unsuccessful cable: it strives to peel off after several months, “brightened” by our warm and friendly climate. Nevertheless, despite this, the EX71 is still selling well, especially since the price of these headphones has dropped below a thousand rubles.

In this material, we will not talk about the EX71, but about their successor or, rather, the successor of the idea, the MDR-EX81 model. These headphones at the heart of the design are all the same good old EX-71, only they were added to the behind-the-ears. Considering that, despite its popularity, the EX71 never made it to the editorial board, I think that a story about a newer model will be quite appropriate.

Body and design

The EX81 uses time-tested materials, in my opinion, in a very good combination - plastic and metal. Better, perhaps, only a combination of bronze with an old tree or cognac with coffee. In any case, in headphones, unlike the mass of various portable devices, metal is a rare guest. However, the more pleasant it is to see him. A tube is made of a metal alloy that connects the earhooks to the headphones themselves, a cable runs inside it. In addition to this purely utilitarian function, the tubes have one more: they act as the basis for the swivel mechanism. However, the mechanism is loudly said, it's just that the earpiece and handset are fastened in such a way as to ensure that the parts rotate relative to each other by a couple of millimeters in both directions. This little thing, as it seems at first glance, serves to make the headphones more comfortable to wear. It is no secret that we, although we are the happy owners of a pair of such important organs as ears, are all different, so additional freedom of maneuver does not hurt at all. Especially when it comes to wearing headphones for a long time, in the end, the fullness and quality of the sound depends on the angle of their entry into the ear canal, and this is perhaps the most important criterion.

The headphones themselves are quite compact in size, this is due to the relatively small diameter of the speaker. They are made of black plastic, equipped with a mandatory “chrome effect” insert to enhance the wow effect. >. This element could have been made less flashy, the design would never have suffered from this. An example, for example (I apologize for this dictionary construction), could be taken from the same metal tube, which has a noble smoky silver tint.

As far as the quality of workmanship is concerned, there are quite expectedly no complaints: nevertheless, in-ear headphones are so thin that they can be produced either completely without marriage, or not produced at all. Obviously, Sony and other eminent companies in this difficult field have chosen the first option.

I would rate the design of the EX81 as discreetly versatile, adult. Although the chrome insert, in my opinion, still spoils it a little. On the other hand, there are quite a few fans of catchy, even flashy design in our native sixth part of the land (just gouge-out style sweatpants are worth something), so it may well appeal to the less spoiled part of the population than the author.

Headphones are well suited to any style of clothing, very well combined with gadgets of different designs (tested on purple Sony E010 and red Cowon D2). No wonder in a podcast a couple of weeks ago I called them in a good everyday way. Looking ahead, I will say that the sound complements this image. Not in the sense that he is some kind of gray or everyday, but in that he does not require any kind of reverent listening to get the usual, simple buzz from music. The latter, being daily for many, fortunately, is never completely dulled. So, everyday life, in my opinion, is precisely expressed in the fact that you can just put on the headphones and go on business, brightening up your day (or night) with music. At the same time, you don’t have to worry too much about whether they will suit your appearance, or whether your current player is too bad for them.

Sound, usability

Here I, perhaps, will come from the rear and start with a story about the convenience of wearing headphones. For, coupled with a flashy chrome insert (well, it didn’t look to me, even if you crack), the nuances of wearing can spoil the overall impression of the EX81 for someone, or vice versa. In general, the situation with convenience is as follows: it takes a habit. I’ll try to reassure you a little: you won’t have to get used to it for a long time, and not everyone will have to get used to it for a long time. The fact is that after two and a half years of writing reviews, I feel the need to confess to you: I have small ears. Well, not really, of course, small, ordinary, and it’s a sin to complain, the owners of “locators”, I think, would be happy to change. But all kinds of behind-the-ears are not incompatible with my ears, but require a thoughtful selection of the attachment angle and other parameters when you just want to put on headphones and take off. Even the cool and expensive Audio-Technica EM-9d on-ears, with their vaunted spring-loaded and generally technically complex earpieces, took me quite a long time to adjust. A similar situation arose with the EX81. For the first time, forgetting about the previous misfortunes, I began to put them on on the go from the metro to the office, remembering that it would be nice to listen to the recently mined sample. To put on something they put on and even immediately started playing well, but the right earpiece strove to move relative to the desired position. The problem was partially corrected by the cable pulled out of the pocket for a long time, but the earhook was still clearly felt and led to constant fears that the earpiece would fly off.And so I rolled it around my ear for the entire seven or so minutes of walking along the third ring. On the way back, I decided to continue the execution and already internally prepared for further inconvenience, however, after putting on the headphones for the second time, I felt a “paradigm shift”. The earplugs have become more comfortable. Apparently, on the second attempt, they simply managed to catch the very right angle. After a dozen or two minutes, already in the subway, I realized that I forgot about the headphones, and in general they felt the same as those from wearing ordinary in-ear headphones. Bottom line: if you've been using over-the-ear headphones for any amount of time, then with the EX81, most likely, no roughness will arise at all. If not, you need to try on the headphones, and if you happen to buy without trying on, just try to be a little patient or change the angle. Well, if it’s not fate at all, as they say, come to our forum, in the Flea Market section.

In terms of sound, everything is much more boring. In short: he's good. True, if we end here, I'm afraid that my colleagues and the editor-in-chief will not understand me, not to mention those who read the material, that is, you. Therefore, I report in detail. Fans of Sony's sound will not be disappointed. Bass is present in the right volume, but the ears do not tear. If suddenly you don’t have enough of them, try slightly changing the angle of the earpiece in the channel or, in extreme cases, turn on the bass boost on the player (this is an extreme option, equalizers most often spoil the sound). With medium and high, in general, the order: the former are quite pleasant to the ear, and the latter do not cut the ears. By the way, about cutting. Unfortunately, you won't be able to get "ear-shattering" sound with the EX81. That is, the headphones are loud enough, but only for those who listen to music, say, in the range from 50 to 80 percent of the volume of a player with an average power audio path. Above, "wheezing" is already beginning, when the speaker, whose diameter is only 9 millimeters, begins to simply not withstand the input power. However, you should not be afraid of this, editorial players traditionally have a serious power reserve simply because they are used for various tests. Most conventional flash players are unlikely to overload the headphones. By the way, I can recommend them with a light heart as a "garnish" for the new playdrives of the parent company.

Conclusions and impressions

As a result, we have in-ear headphones with an unusual design, they stand out well from the general background and attract attention. Soft earhooks have an average level of comfort, you may need to "tweak the angle". The sound is expectedly good, but there is not much power reserve. All other impressions are generally positive; to refresh them in memory, it is enough to re-read the two previous pieces of the review.

Sony MDR-EX81 in-ear headphones review

Sony in-ear headphones, like the company's players (then still cassette), gave rise to a whole cult. Ten years ago, it was not uncommon for users to specifically buy Sony headphones to use them with a player from another brand. Today, against the background of the abundance of player models and the general low level of standard headphones, this practice does not look like something special, but then it spoke of the presence of a certain halo around these headphones, their special reputation. It consisted in many respects not in the high sound quality in general, but in the presence of a decent return at low frequencies. It often happened that people connected new headphones to their player and were surprised at the bass, which seemed to “come from nowhere”. For me, let’s say, the realization of the “Sony headphone effect” happened just during the second round of the Moscow “revolution”, so I had the warmest feelings for Sony headphones of the Fontopia series, and then Groove (I don’t even remember the models now). It is also worth remembering that inexpensive cassette and disc players, which accounted for the bulk of sales, were accompanied by overhead headphones, and not the best ones. Maybe my vision here is too rosy and subjective, but for some time in-ear headphones were even perceived as more “prestigious” and were generally more expensive than mid-range over-ear headphones.

At the same time, Sony acted as the main innovator, at least in those models that were presented on the Russian market. Her headphones were the first to receive a shape more appropriate to the anatomical features of the ear, a special Groove sound channel (a kind of prototype of the subsequent insulator). It was also the Sony headphones that had an unbalanced cable that could be passed behind the head from the back of the head. It is possible that Sony was not a pioneer here, but it was the headphones of this company that were remembered.

Then there is a lull - the digital revolution, cassette players are finally gone, MiniDiscs are not sold well, CD-Walkman is at first unaffordable for the main mass of consumers, and then has to fight with MP3-CD players and eventually lose. Of course, the company still produces headphones, presents new models, but they are already being sold against the background of products from other companies active in Russia. Philips was especially distinguished in this regard (at least headphones of this particular brand were sold in almost every stall with pirated discs). At the same time, they could not boast of any outstanding sound, being strong middle peasants, but they took a fashionable (at that time) silver design and almost a dumping price.

Then, probably already in the year 2005, the era of in-ear headphones with a silicone insulator began (era is a loud word, but it describes what is happening well). They seriously differed from their usual counterparts in the level of isolation of ambient noise, the quality and volume of the sound and, quite expectedly, the level of return at low frequencies. The pioneer who prepared users for such headphones can be called the KOSS The Plug model. They were deprived of a full-fledged insulator, the ear canal was insulated with foamed polymer material, which gradually expanded after compression. But the headphones had the main thing: a relatively low price and an outstanding level of bass volume. It doesn't matter that the purists grimaced at the roaring and muffled bass with a minimum of accents. But the happy owners of The Plug could, spitting on all the precautions, turn on their favorite song at such a volume that their eyes began to itch from the inside. It was a definite success.

Over time, in-ear headphones with an isolator have filtered into almost all price segments and today they are no longer perceived as something new or exotic. Sony Ericsson in-ear headphones and headsets, attached to some models of Walkman series phones, played a significant role in this (they can also be purchased separately). Given the popularity of phones, a very large proportion of buyers of in-ear headphones with an isolator have already seen them with friends and acquaintances, which is worth a lot.

But back to Sony. In a period of decline in its own activity in the portable audio market and sluggish attempts to regain its former glory, Sony still continued to produce good headphones. One of these models was the MDR-EX71 headphones. They have a lot of fans, despite the fact that the EX71 is by no means without flaws. The picture, written by a decent sound and ease of use, is somewhat spoiled by a frankly unsuccessful cable: it strives to peel off after several months, “brightened” by our warm and friendly climate. Nevertheless, despite this, the EX71 is still selling well, especially since the price of these headphones has dropped below a thousand rubles.

In this material, we will not talk about the EX71, but about their successor or, rather, the successor of the idea, the MDR-EX81 model. These headphones at the heart of the design are all the same good old EX-71, only they were added to the behind-the-ears. Considering that, despite its popularity, the EX71 never made it to the editorial board, I think that a story about a newer model will be quite appropriate.

Body and design

The EX81 uses time-tested materials, in my opinion, in a very good combination - plastic and metal. Better, perhaps, only a combination of bronze with an old tree or cognac with coffee. In any case, in headphones, unlike the mass of various portable devices, metal is a rare guest. However, the more pleasant it is to see him. A tube is made of a metal alloy that connects the earhooks to the headphones themselves, a cable runs inside it. In addition to this purely utilitarian function, the tubes have one more: they act as the basis for the swivel mechanism. However, the mechanism is loudly said, it's just that the earpiece and handset are fastened in such a way as to ensure that the parts rotate relative to each other by a couple of millimeters in both directions. This little thing, as it seems at first glance, serves to make the headphones more comfortable to wear. It is no secret that we, although we are the happy owners of a pair of such important organs as ears, are all different, so additional freedom of maneuver does not hurt at all. Especially when it comes to wearing headphones for a long time, in the end, the fullness and quality of the sound depends on the angle of their entry into the ear canal, and this is perhaps the most important criterion.

The headphones themselves are quite compact in size, this is due to the relatively small diameter of the speaker. They are made of black plastic, equipped with a mandatory “chrome effect” insert to enhance the wow effect. >. This element could have been made less flashy, the design would never have suffered from this. An example, for example (I apologize for this dictionary construction), could be taken from the same metal tube, which has a noble smoky silver tint.

As far as the quality of workmanship is concerned, there are quite expectedly no complaints: nevertheless, in-ear headphones are so thin that they can be produced either completely without marriage, or not produced at all. Obviously, Sony and other eminent companies in this difficult field have chosen the first option.

I would rate the design of the EX81 as discreetly versatile, adult. Although the chrome insert, in my opinion, still spoils it a little. On the other hand, there are quite a few fans of catchy, even flashy design in our native sixth part of the land (just gouge-out style sweatpants are worth something), so it may well appeal to the less spoiled part of the population than the author.

Headphones are well suited to any style of clothing, very well combined with gadgets of different designs (tested on purple Sony E010 and red Cowon D2). No wonder in a podcast a couple of weeks ago I called them in a good everyday way. Looking ahead, I will say that the sound complements this image. Not in the sense that he is some kind of gray or everyday, but in that he does not require any kind of reverent listening to get the usual, simple buzz from music. The latter, being daily for many, fortunately, is never completely dulled. So, everyday life, in my opinion, is precisely expressed in the fact that you can just put on the headphones and go on business, brightening up your day (or night) with music. At the same time, you don’t need to worry too much about whether they will suit your appearance, or whether your current player is too bad for them.

Sound, usability

Here I, perhaps, will come from the rear and start with a story about the convenience of wearing headphones. For, coupled with a flashy chrome insert (well, it didn’t look to me, even if you crack), the nuances of wearing can spoil the overall impression of the EX81 for someone, or vice versa. In general, the situation with convenience is as follows: it takes a habit. I’ll try to reassure you a little: you won’t have to get used to it for a long time, and not everyone will have to get used to it for a long time. The fact is that after two and a half years of writing reviews, I feel the need to confess to you: I have small ears. Well, not really, of course, small, ordinary, and it’s a sin to complain, the owners of “locators”, I think, would be happy to change. But all kinds of behind-the-ears are not incompatible with my ears, but require a thoughtful selection of the attachment angle and other parameters when you just want to put on headphones and take off. Even the cool and expensive Audio-Technica EM-9d on-ears, with their vaunted spring-loaded and generally technically complex earpieces, took me quite a long time to adjust. A similar situation arose with the EX81. For the first time, forgetting about the previous misfortunes, I began to put them on on the go from the metro to the office, remembering that it would be nice to listen to the recently mined sample. To put on something they put on and even immediately started playing well, but the right earpiece strove to move relative to the desired position. The problem was partially corrected by the cable pulled out of the pocket for a long time, but the earhook was still clearly felt and led to constant fears that the earpiece would fly off.And so I rolled it around my ear for the entire seven or so minutes of walking along the third ring. On the way back, I decided to continue the execution and already internally prepared for further inconvenience, however, after putting on the headphones for the second time, I felt a “paradigm shift”. The earplugs have become more comfortable. Apparently, on the second attempt, they simply managed to catch the very right angle. After a dozen or two minutes, already in the subway, I realized that I forgot about the headphones, and in general they felt the same as those from wearing ordinary in-ear headphones. Bottom line: if you've been using over-the-ear headphones for any amount of time, then with the EX81, most likely, no roughness will arise at all. If not, you need to try on the headphones, and if you happen to buy without trying on, just try to be a little patient or change the angle. Well, if it’s not fate at all, as they say, come to our forum, in the Flea Market section.

In terms of sound, everything is much more boring. In short: he's good. True, if we end here, I'm afraid that my colleagues and the editor-in-chief will not understand me, not to mention those who read the material, that is, you. Therefore, I report in detail. Fans of Sony's sound will not be disappointed. Bass is present in the right volume, but the ears do not tear. If suddenly you don’t have enough of them, try slightly changing the angle of the earpiece in the channel or, in extreme cases, turn on the bass boost on the player (this is an extreme option, equalizers most often spoil the sound). With medium and high, in general, the order: the former are quite pleasant to the ear, and the latter do not cut the ears. By the way, about cutting. Unfortunately, you won't be able to get "ear-shattering" sound with the EX81. That is, the headphones are loud enough, but only for those who listen to music, say, in the range from 50 to 80 percent of the volume of a player with an average power audio path. Above, "wheezing" is already beginning, when the speaker, whose diameter is only 9 millimeters, begins to simply not withstand the input power. However, you should not be afraid of this, editorial players traditionally have a serious power reserve simply because they are used for various tests. Most conventional flash players are unlikely to overload the headphones. By the way, I can recommend them with a light heart as a "garnish" for the new playdrives of the parent company.

Conclusions and impressions

As a result, we have in-ear headphones with an unusual design, they stand out well from the general background and attract attention. Soft earhooks have an average level of comfort, you may need to "tweak the angle". The sound is expectedly good, but there is not much power reserve. All other impressions are generally positive; to refresh them in memory, it is enough to re-read the two previous pieces of the review.

Sony MDR-EX81 in-ear headphones review

Sony in-ear headphones, like the company's players (then still cassette), gave rise to a whole cult. Ten years ago, it was not uncommon for users to specifically buy Sony headphones to use them with a player from another brand. Today, against the background of the abundance of player models and the general low level of standard headphones, this practice does not look like something special, but then it spoke of the presence of a certain halo around these headphones, their special reputation. It consisted in many respects not in the high sound quality in general, but in the presence of a decent return at low frequencies. It often happened that people connected new headphones to their player and were surprised at the bass, which seemed to “come from nowhere”. For me, let’s say, the realization of the “Sony headphone effect” happened just during the second round of the Moscow “revolution”, so I had the warmest feelings for Sony headphones of the Fontopia series, and then Groove (I don’t even remember the models now). It is also worth remembering that inexpensive cassette and disc players, which accounted for the bulk of sales, were accompanied by overhead headphones, and not the best ones. Maybe my vision here is too rosy and subjective, but for some time in-ear headphones were even perceived as more “prestigious” and were generally more expensive than mid-range over-ear headphones.

At the same time, Sony acted as the main innovator, at least in those models that were presented on the Russian market. Her headphones were the first to receive a shape more appropriate to the anatomical features of the ear, a special Groove sound channel (a kind of prototype of the subsequent insulator). It was also the Sony headphones that had an unbalanced cable that could be passed behind the head from the back of the head. It is possible that Sony was not a pioneer here, but it was the headphones of this company that were remembered.

Then there is a lull - the digital revolution, cassette players are finally gone, MiniDiscs are not sold well, CD-Walkman is at first unaffordable for the main mass of consumers, and then has to fight with MP3-CD players and eventually lose. Of course, the company still produces headphones, presents new models, but they are already being sold against the background of products from other companies active in Russia. Philips was especially distinguished in this regard (at least headphones of this particular brand were sold in almost every stall with pirated discs). At the same time, they could not boast of any outstanding sound, being strong middle peasants, but they took a fashionable (at that time) silver design and almost a dumping price.

Then, probably already in the year 2005, the era of in-ear headphones with a silicone insulator began (era is a loud word, but it describes what is happening well). They seriously differed from their usual counterparts in the level of isolation of ambient noise, the quality and loudness of the sound and, quite expectedly, the level of return at low frequencies. The pioneer who prepared users for such headphones can be called the KOSS The Plug model. They were deprived of a full-fledged insulator, the ear canal was insulated with foamed polymer material, which gradually expanded after compression. But the headphones had the main thing: a relatively low price and an outstanding level of bass volume. It doesn't matter that the purists grimaced at the roaring and muffled bass with a minimum of accents. But the happy owners of The Plug could, spitting on all the precautions, turn on their favorite song at such a volume that their eyes began to itch from the inside. It was a definite success.

Over time, in-ear headphones with an isolator have filtered into almost all price segments and today they are no longer perceived as something new or exotic. Sony Ericsson in-ear headphones and headsets, which are attached to some models of Walkman series phones, played a significant role in this (they can also be purchased separately). Given the popularity of phones, a very large proportion of buyers of in-ear headphones with an isolator have already seen them with friends and acquaintances, which is worth a lot.

But back to Sony. In a period of decline in its own activity in the portable audio market and sluggish attempts to regain its former glory, Sony still continued to produce good headphones. One of these models was the MDR-EX71 headphones. They have a lot of fans, despite the fact that the EX71 is by no means without flaws. The picture, written by a decent sound and ease of use, is somewhat spoiled by a frankly unsuccessful cable: it strives to peel off after several months, “brightened” by our warm and friendly climate. Nevertheless, despite this, the EX71 is still selling well, especially since the price of these headphones has dropped below a thousand rubles.

In this material, we will not talk about the EX71, but about their successor or, rather, the successor of the idea, the MDR-EX81 model. These headphones at the heart of the design are all the same good old EX-71, only they were added to the behind-the-ears. Considering that, despite its popularity, the EX71 never made it to the editorial board, I think that a story about a newer model will be quite appropriate.

Body and design

The EX81 uses time-tested materials, in my opinion, in a very good combination - plastic and metal. Better, perhaps, only a combination of bronze with an old tree or cognac with coffee. In any case, in headphones, unlike the mass of various portable devices, metal is a rare guest. However, the more pleasant it is to see him. A tube is made of a metal alloy that connects the earhooks to the headphones themselves, a cable runs inside it. In addition to this purely utilitarian function, the tubes have one more: they act as the basis for the swivel mechanism. However, the mechanism is loudly said, it's just that the earpiece and handset are fastened in such a way as to ensure that the parts rotate relative to each other by a couple of millimeters in both directions. This little thing, as it seems at first glance, serves to make the headphones more comfortable to wear. It is no secret that we, although we are the happy owners of a pair of such important organs as ears, are all different, so additional freedom of maneuver does not hurt at all. Especially when it comes to wearing headphones for a long time, in the end, the fullness and quality of the sound depends on the angle of their entry into the ear canal, and this is perhaps the most important criterion.

The headphones themselves are quite compact in size, this is due to the relatively small diameter of the speaker. They are made of black plastic, equipped with a mandatory “chrome-like” insert to increase the wow effect https://cars45.com.gh/2YpEkdDuBLrXVazc2zeaYCoB. This element could have been made less flashy, the design would never have suffered from this. An example, for example (I apologize for this dictionary construction), could be taken from the same metal tube, which has a noble smoky silver tint.

The headphones themselves are quite compact in size, this is due to the relatively small diameter of the speaker. They are made of black plastic, equipped with a mandatory “chrome-like” insert to enhance the wow effect. https://cars45.com.gh/2YpEkdDuBLrXVazc2zeaYCoB https://cars45.com.gh/2YpEkdDuBLrXVazc2zeaYCoB . This element could have been made less flashy, the design would never have suffered from this. An example, for example (I apologize for this dictionary construction), could be taken from the same metal tube, which has a noble smoky silver tint.

As far as the quality of workmanship is concerned, there are quite expectedly no complaints: nevertheless, in-ear headphones are so thin that they can be produced either completely without marriage, or not produced at all. Obviously, Sony and other eminent companies in this difficult field have chosen the first option.

I would rate the design of the EX81 as discreetly versatile, grown-up. Although the chrome insert, in my opinion, still spoils it a little. On the other hand, there are quite a few fans of catchy, even flashy design in our native sixth part of the land (sweatpants alone are worth a lot), so it may well appeal to the less spoiled part of the population than the author.

Headphones are well suited to any style of clothing, very well combined with gadgets of different designs (tested on purple Sony E010 and red Cowon D2). No wonder in a podcast a couple of weeks ago I called them in a good everyday way. Looking ahead, I will say that the sound complements this image. Not in the sense that he is some kind of gray or everyday, but in that he does not require any kind of reverent listening to get the usual, simple buzz from music. The latter, being daily for many, fortunately, is never completely dulled. So, everyday life, in my opinion, is precisely expressed in the fact that you can just put on the headphones and go on business, brightening up your day (or night) with music. At the same time, you don’t have to worry too much about whether they will suit your appearance, or whether your current player is too bad for them.

Sound, usability

Here I, perhaps, will come from the rear and start with a story about the convenience of wearing headphones. For, coupled with a flashy chrome insert (well, it didn’t look to me, even if you crack), the nuances of wearing can spoil the overall impression of the EX81 for someone, or vice versa. In general, the situation with convenience is as follows: it takes a habit. I’ll try to reassure you a little: you won’t have to get used to it for a long time, and not everyone will have to get used to it for a long time. The fact is that after two and a half years of writing reviews, I feel the need to confess to you: I have small ears. Well, not really, of course, small, ordinary, and it’s a sin to complain, the owners of “locators”, I think, would be happy to change. But all kinds of behind-the-ears are not incompatible with my ears, but require a thoughtful selection of the attachment angle and other parameters when you just want to put on headphones and take off. Even the cool and expensive Audio-Technica EM-9d on-ears, with their vaunted spring-loaded and generally technically complex earpieces, took me quite a long time to adjust. A similar situation arose with the EX81. For the first time, forgetting about the previous misfortunes, I began to put them on on the go from the metro to the office, remembering that it would be nice to listen to the recently mined sample. To put on something they put on and even immediately started playing well, but the right earpiece strove to move relative to the desired position. The problem was partially corrected by the cable pulled out of the pocket for a long time, but the earhook was still clearly felt and led to constant fears that the earpiece would fly off.And so I rolled it around my ear for the entire seven or so minutes of walking along the third ring. On the way back, I decided to continue the execution and already internally prepared for further inconvenience, however, after putting on the headphones for the second time, I felt a “paradigm shift”. The earplugs have become more comfortable. Apparently, on the second attempt, they simply managed to catch the very right angle. After a dozen or two minutes, already in the subway, I realized that I forgot about the headphones, and in general they felt the same as those from wearing ordinary in-ear headphones. Bottom line: if you've been using over-the-ear headphones for any amount of time, then with the EX81, most likely, no roughness will arise at all. If not, you need to try on the headphones, and if you happen to buy without trying on, just try to be a little patient or change the angle. Well, if it’s not fate at all, as they say, come to our forum, in the Flea Market section.

In terms of sound, everything is much more boring. In short: he's good. True, if we end here, I'm afraid that my colleagues and the editor-in-chief will not understand me, not to mention those who read the material, that is, you. Therefore, I report in detail. Fans of Sony's sound will not be disappointed. Bass is present in the right volume, but the ears do not tear. If suddenly you don’t have enough of them, try slightly changing the angle of the earpiece in the channel or, in extreme cases, turn on the bass boost on the player (this is an extreme option, equalizers most often spoil the sound). With medium and high, in general, the order: the former are quite pleasant to the ear, and the latter do not cut the ears. By the way, about cutting. Unfortunately, you won't be able to get "ear-shattering" sound with the EX81. That is, the headphones are loud enough, but only for those who listen to music, say, in the range from 50 to 80 percent of the volume of a player with an average power audio path. Above, "wheezing" is already beginning, when the speaker, whose diameter is only 9 millimeters, begins to simply not withstand the input power. However, you should not be afraid of this, editorial players traditionally have a serious power reserve simply because they are used for various tests. Most conventional flash players are unlikely to overload the headphones. By the way, I can recommend them with a light heart as a "garnish" for the new playdrives of the parent company.

Conclusions and impressions

As a result, we have in-ear headphones with an unusual design, they stand out well from the general background and attract attention. Soft earhooks have an average level of comfort, you may need to "tweak the angle". The sound is expectedly good, but there is not much power reserve. All other impressions are generally positive, to refresh them in memory, it is enough to re-read the previous two pieces of the review.