Phonak Audeo PFE 232 headphones review

On our website there was a review of the first version of headphones from Phonak, I recommend that you familiarize yourself with it - after all, the PFE 232 model is a logical continuation of the 100th line.

A quick look at the current Phonak range. There are three rulers:

  • Silver - models 012/022, the second - with remote control and microphone for Apple technology. Prices are $119 and $129 respectively;
  • Gold Mercedes-benz - 111/112 models – without remote control and microphone, 121/122 - with button and microphone, 132 - with remote control and microphone. Prices are $179, $199 and $239 respectively;
  • Platinum is the only 232 model, black, with remote and microphone. The price is $599.

Agree that the PFE 232 model stands out from the company's slender lineup, at least in terms of price. For $600, competing companies like Shure and Westone offer top-of-the-line models with three and even four drivers based on micro-armature technology, the same as used by Phonak. But in the headphones of this company there are “only” two such electro-acoustic transducers. For what they ask for such money, let's try to find out.

Packaging and accessories

Regarding the PFE 111 model that I had in my review, the set of 232 headphones has clearly changed for the better: silicone tips have been added, and foam tips have become black. However, this is secondary, albeit pleasant. There was a cover, a "cleaner" for sound guides, a set of replaceable filters, earplugs.

I will not write about replaceable filters again, I will just quote myself:

The tidy box of sound filters has a tool holder with which to change the sound filters. It is worth noting the following fact. In Etymotic, either out of greed, or for some engineering reasons, they did not thread the filters. This means that when the filter is replaced, the latter becomes unusable - the tool clings to the fabric stretched over the metal cylinder. Phonak did the wise and practical thing of putting in a few spare filters in case they got dirty, and making filters with different acoustic characteristics and letting you change them to your heart's content. With proper skill, replacing the filter on one earphone takes about 10 seconds.

I also note that the kit includes as many as six instruction manuals, all of them in different languages. There is no Russian among them, which is a pity.

Appearance and usability

The Phonak PFE 232 looks somewhat unusual: a beautifully curved two-tone body (the combination of gloss and metal-look plastic is very stylish). Material - I repeat - plastic, nothing special. Build quality is excellent, no complaints. The sound guides come out of the cases at a slight angle, their diameter is non-standard (however, this is a common situation for "reinforcing" headphones). The filters are replaceable, as well as the wire - the kit includes both a regular cable with a three-pin connector and a wire for Apple technology. Replacement is simple, the connector does not loosen - everything is fine.

I'll tell you right away about the wire for Apple technology, there is a volume control, a microphone and a multifunction button. The ergonomics of the remote control is average, you have to get used to the tactile sensation from the buttons. The microphone is good, the interlocutors do not complain about the quality of speech transmission.

Headphones tested with Hifiman HM-801 players (with Game Card amplifier) ​​and iBasso DX100. The Prime Test CD1 was used.

Since the sound of the headphones can be changed using filters, let's go through all the options. Let's start with the standard gray filters.

The emphasis is on the midrange, the highs are noticeably muffled. Low frequencies are worked out well, their number is a bit redundant. Due to the slight emphasis, the mids sound harsh, but no more. There is not enough sound volume - the stereo panorama is wide, but there is practically no volume. The attack is excellent, it is not easy to overload the headphones. The detail is quite high, but the dynamic range is small - the music sounds very flat and inexpressive.

Black filters add bass and treble, while significantly reducing mids. As a result, of course, a “dynamic” sound does not work out - at the output we have a muddy sound, rather booming. The advantage is that the sharpness goes away in the midrange and does not appear at high frequencies - but, in my opinion, with the “removal” of the midrange, there was a bust.

Green filters just add low frequencies - so you get a boomy "boombox" with muffled highs and bright mids. In my opinion, it’s not worth mocking the “reinforcement” like that, but the company’s engineers know better.

One way or another, I did not like any of the sound options - one frequency range gets stuck, then another. In principle, the least evil is the option with black filters.

Compatibility

The headphones played well with the Apple iPhone 4, no particular dependence on the source level was found.

Output

For the asking $600, buying a PFE 232 is absolutely pointless. In Russia, they can be purchased even cheaper than MSRP - but even for 15.5 thousand rubles, this is not the kind of purchase that is worth making. Two "armature" drivers can't cost that much, even with replaceable filters (which don't help the headphones "sound" properly).

Phonak Audeo PFE 232 headphones review

On our website there was a review of the first version of headphones from Phonak, I recommend that you familiarize yourself with it - after all, the PFE 232 model is a logical continuation of the 100th line.

A quick look at the current Phonak range. There are three rulers:

  • Silver - models 012/022, the second - with remote control and microphone for Apple technology. Prices are $119 and $129 respectively;
  • Gold Mercedes-benz - 111/112 models – without remote control and microphone, 121/122 - with button and microphone, 132 - with remote control and microphone. Prices are $179, $199 and $239 respectively;
  • Platinum is the only 232 model, black, with remote and microphone. The price is $599.

Agree that the PFE 232 model stands out from the company's slender lineup, at least in terms of price. For $600, competing companies like Shure and Westone offer top-of-the-line models with three and even four drivers based on micro-armature technology, the same as used by Phonak. But in the headphones of this company there are “only” two such electro-acoustic transducers. For what they ask for such money, let's try to find out.

Packaging and accessories

Regarding the PFE 111 model that I had in my review, the set of 232 headphones has clearly changed for the better: silicone tips have been added, and foam tips have become black. However, this is secondary, albeit pleasant. There was a cover, a "cleaner" for sound guides, a set of replaceable filters, earplugs.

Appearance and usability

The Phonak PFE 232 looks somewhat unusual: a beautifully curved two-tone body (the combination of gloss and metal-look plastic is very stylish). Material - I repeat - plastic, nothing special. Build quality is excellent, no complaints. The sound guides come out of the cases at a slight angle, their diameter is non-standard (however, this is a common situation for "reinforcing" headphones). The filters are replaceable, as well as the wire - the kit includes both a regular cable with a three-pin connector and a wire for Apple technology. Replacement is simple, the connector does not loosen - everything is fine.

I'll tell you right away about the wire for Apple technology, there is a volume control, a microphone and a multifunction button. The ergonomics of the remote control is average, you have to get used to the tactile sensation from the buttons. The microphone is good, the interlocutors do not complain about the quality of speech transmission.

>

Since the sound of the headphones can be changed using filters, let's go through all the options. Let's start with the standard gray filters.

The emphasis is on the midrange, the highs are noticeably muffled. Low frequencies are worked out well, their number is a bit redundant. Due to the slight emphasis, the mids sound harsh, but no more. There is not enough sound volume - the stereo panorama is wide, but there is practically no volume. The attack is excellent, it is not easy to overload the headphones. The detail is quite high, but the dynamic range is small - the music sounds very flat and inexpressive.

Black filters add bass and treble, while significantly reducing mids. As a result, of course, a “dynamic” sound does not work out - at the output we have a muddy sound, rather booming. The advantage is that the sharpness goes away in the midrange and does not appear at high frequencies - but, in my opinion, with the “removal” of the midrange, there was a bust.

Green filters just add low frequencies - so you get a boomy "boombox" with muffled highs and bright mids. In my opinion, it’s not worth mocking the “reinforcement” like that, but the company’s engineers know better.

One way or another, I did not like any of the sound options - one frequency range gets stuck, then another. In principle, the least evil is the option with black filters.

Compatibility

The headphones played well with the Apple iPhone 4, no particular dependence on the source level was found.

Output

For the asking $600, buying a PFE 232 is absolutely pointless. In Russia, they can be purchased even cheaper than MSRP - but even for 15.5 thousand rubles, this is not the kind of purchase that is worth making. Two "armature" drivers can't cost that much, even with replaceable filters (which don't help the headphones "sound" properly).

Phonak Audeo PFE 232 headphones review

On our website there was a review of the first version of headphones from Phonak, I recommend that you familiarize yourself with it - after all, the PFE 232 model is a logical continuation of the 100th line.

A quick look at the current Phonak range. There are three rulers:

  • Silver - models 012/022, the second - with remote control and microphone for Apple technology. Prices are $119 and $129 respectively;
  • Gold Mercedes-benz - Models 111/112 – without remote control and microphone, 121/122 - with button and microphone, 132 - with remote control and microphone. Prices are $179, $199 and $239 respectively;
  • Platinum is the only 232 model, black, with remote and microphone. The price is $599.

Agree that the PFE 232 model stands out from the company's slender lineup, at least in terms of price. For $600, competing companies like Shure and Westone offer top-of-the-line models with three and even four drivers based on micro-armature technology, the same as used by Phonak. But in the headphones of this company there are “only” two such electro-acoustic transducers. For what they ask for such money, let's try to find out.

Packaging and accessories

Regarding the PFE 111 model that I had in my review, the set of 232 headphones has clearly changed for the better: silicone tips have been added, and foam tips have become black. However, this is secondary, albeit pleasant. There was a cover, a "cleaner" for sound guides, a set of replaceable filters, earplugs.

I will not write about replaceable filters again, I will just quote myself:

The tidy box of sound filters has a tool holder with which to change the sound filters. It is worth noting the following fact. In Etymotic, either out of greed, or for some engineering reasons, they did not thread the filters. This means that when the filter is replaced, the latter becomes unusable - the tool clings to the fabric stretched over the metal cylinder. Phonak did the wise and practical thing by investing in a few spare filters in case of contamination, and also made filters with different acoustic characteristics and allowed to change them to your heart's content. With proper skill, replacing the filter on one earphone takes about 10 seconds.

I also note that the kit includes as many as six instruction manuals, all of them in different languages. There is no Russian among them, which is a pity.

Appearance and usability

The Phonak PFE 232 looks somewhat unusual: a beautifully curved two-tone body (the combination of gloss and metal-look plastic is very stylish). Material - I repeat - plastic, nothing special. Build quality is excellent, no complaints. The sound guides come out of the cases at a slight angle, their diameter is non-standard (however, this is a common situation for "reinforcing" headphones). The filters are replaceable, as well as the wire - the kit includes both a regular cable with a three-pin connector and a wire for Apple technology. Replacement is simple, the connector does not loosen - everything is fine.

I'll tell you right away about the wire for Apple technology, there is a volume control, a microphone and a multifunction button. The ergonomics of the remote control is average, you have to get used to the tactile sensation from the buttons. The microphone is good, the interlocutors do not complain about the quality of speech transmission.

>

Regular wire - the same as described above, but without a remote control. The plugs of both cables are "L"-shaped, intricately curved and miniature. Reliability is not clear, but interchangeability is definitely pleasing. The wires have sliders for fixing, but the “Apple” wire has a remote control located so that the cable cannot be fixed on the chin.

The fit of the PFE 232 can be either regular or behind the ear. I preferred the behind-the-ear option, but this is a matter of taste. Noise isolation is good both with silicone nozzles and foam ones - but in the subway, noise still breaks through quite well, why this happens is unclear. Maybe the body is to blame. One way or another, you expect more from the "reinforcement".

Headphones tested with Hifiman HM-801 players (with Game Card amplifier) ​​and iBasso DX100. The Prime Test CD1 was used.

Since the sound of headphones can be changed using filters, let's go through all the options. Let's start with the standard gray filters.

The emphasis is on the midrange, the highs are noticeably muffled. Low frequencies are worked out well, their number is a bit redundant. Due to the slight emphasis, the mids sound harsh, but no more. There is not enough sound volume - the stereo panorama is wide, but there is practically no volume. The attack is excellent, it is not easy to overload the headphones. The detail is quite high, but the dynamic range is small - the music sounds very flat and inexpressive.

The black filters add bass and treble, while significantly reducing the mids. As a result, of course, a “dynamic” sound does not work out - at the output we have a muddy sound, rather booming. The advantage is that the sharpness goes away in the midrange and does not appear at high frequencies - but, in my opinion, with the “removal” of the midrange, there was a bust.

Green filters just add low frequencies - so you get a boomy "boombox" with muffled highs and bright mids. In my opinion, it’s not worth mocking the “reinforcement” like that, but the company’s engineers know better.

One way or another, I did not like any of the sound options - one frequency range gets stuck, then another. In principle, the least evil is the option with black filters.

Compatibility

The headphones played well with the Apple iPhone 4, no particular dependence on the source level was found.

Output

For the asking $600, buying a PFE 232 is absolutely pointless. In Russia, they can be purchased even cheaper than MSRP - but even for 15.5 thousand rubles, this is not the kind of purchase that is worth making. Two "armature" drivers can't cost that much, even with replaceable filters (which don't help the headphones "sound" properly).

Phonak Audeo PFE 232 headphones review

On our website there was a review of the first version of headphones from Phonak, I recommend that you familiarize yourself with it - after all, the PFE 232 model is a logical continuation of the 100th line.

Agree that the PFE 232 model stands out from the company's slender lineup, at least in terms of price. For $600, competing companies like Shure and Westone offer top-of-the-line models with three and even four drivers based on micro-armature technology, the same as used by Phonak. But in the headphones of this company there are “only” two such electro-acoustic transducers. For what they ask for such money, let's try to find out.

Packaging and accessories

Regarding the PFE 111 model that I had in my review, the set of 232 headphones has clearly changed for the better: silicone tips have been added, and foam tips have become black. However, this is secondary, albeit pleasant. There was a cover, a "cleaner" for sound guides, a set of replaceable filters, earplugs.

I will not write about replaceable filters again, I will just quote myself:

The tidy box of sound filters has a tool holder with which to change the sound filters. It is worth noting the following fact. In Etymotic, either out of greed, or for some engineering reasons, they did not thread the filters. This means that when the filter is replaced, the latter becomes unusable - the tool clings to the fabric stretched over the metal cylinder. Phonak did the wise and practical thing of putting in a few spare filters in case they got dirty, and making filters with different acoustic characteristics and letting you change them to your heart's content. With proper skill, replacing the filter on one earphone takes about 10 seconds.

I also note that the kit includes as many as six instruction manuals, all of them in different languages. There is no Russian among them, which is a pity.

Appearance and usability

The Phonak PFE 232 looks somewhat unusual: a beautifully curved two-tone body (the combination of gloss and metal-look plastic is very stylish). Material - I repeat - plastic, nothing special. Build quality is excellent, no complaints. The sound guides come out of the cases at a slight angle, their diameter is non-standard (however, this is a common situation for "reinforcing" headphones). The filters are replaceable, as well as the wire - the kit includes both a regular cable with a three-pin connector and a wire for Apple technology. Replacement is simple, the connector does not loosen - everything is fine.

I'll tell you right away about the wire for Apple technology, there is a volume control, a microphone and a multifunction button. The ergonomics of the remote control is average, you have to get used to the tactile sensation from the buttons. The microphone is good, the interlocutors do not complain about the quality of speech transmission.

>

Regular wire - the same as described above, but without a remote control. The plugs of both cables are "L"-shaped, intricately curved and miniature. Reliability is not clear, but interchangeability is definitely pleasing. The wires have sliders for fixing, but the “Apple” wire has a remote control located so that the cable cannot be fixed on the chin.

The fit of the PFE 232 can be either regular or behind the ear. I preferred the behind-the-ear option, but this is a matter of taste. Noise isolation is good both with silicone nozzles and foam ones - but in the subway, noise still breaks through quite well, why this happens is unclear. Maybe the body is to blame. One way or another, you expect more from the "reinforcement".

Headphones tested with Hifiman HM-801 players (with Game Card amplifier) ​​and iBasso DX100. The Prime Test CD1 was used.

Since the sound of the headphones can be changed using filters, let's go through all the options. Let's start with the standard gray filters.

The emphasis is on the midrange, the highs are noticeably muffled. Low frequencies are worked out well, their number is a bit redundant. Due to the slight emphasis, the mids sound harsh, but no more. There is not enough sound volume - the stereo panorama is wide, but there is practically no volume. The attack is excellent, it is not easy to overload the headphones. The detail is quite high, but the dynamic range is small - the music sounds very flat and inexpressive.

Black filters add bass and treble, while significantly reducing mids. As a result, of course, a “dynamic” sound does not work out - at the output we have a muddy sound, rather booming. The advantage is that the sharpness goes away in the midrange and does not appear at high frequencies - but, in my opinion, with the “removal” of the midrange, there was a bust.

Green filters just add low frequencies - so you get a boomy "boombox" with muffled highs and bright mids. In my opinion, it’s not worth mocking the “reinforcement” like that, but the company’s engineers know better.

One way or another, I did not like any of the sound options - one frequency range gets stuck, then another. In principle, the least evil is the option with black filters.

Compatibility

The headphones played well with the Apple iPhone 4, no particular dependence on the source level was found.

Output

For the asking $600, buying a PFE 232 is absolutely pointless. In Russia, they can be purchased even cheaper than MSRP - but even for 15.5 thousand rubles, this is not the kind of purchase that is worth making. Two "armature" drivers can't cost that much, even with replaceable filters (which don't help the headphones "sound" properly).