Lytro camera review - a failed revolution

I learned about the small company Lytro long before the appearance of the camera of the same name, at that time it was still a small but promising startup Refocus Imaging. In 2006, it was organized by Stanford University researcher Ren Ng. He received his degree the same year he started his own company, where he became president. The camera was called the Light Field Camera and differed in that it allowed not to point the lens at the object, there was no autofocus. The camera recorded light fluxes, the direction of each ray of light and its strength, which made it possible to further focus the image on the computer. Any object and plan could be sharp, just hover over it with the cursor. In conventional photography, the camera measures the strength of the light, its intensity, but not the direction. So, ordinary photography and camera technology is two-dimensional, but in Light Field cameras, a four-dimensional data array is obtained, which then needs to be converted into a two-dimensional image. The transformation itself does not affect the original data of the photo in any way, only the display of the image in a two-dimensional plane changes, you sharpen one or another part of the photo.

Lytro even came up with a name to denote the information in such a photo - megarays (that is, these are not points, but the number of rays - in the first camera the resolution is 11 megarays).

Information about this technology began to appear widely since the end of 2005, all thanks to the efforts of Ren Ng. Although in fairness it must be said that he is not the inventor of this technology, it was invented in 1908 by Gabriel Lippmann. The story of this man is very interesting, since his contribution to photography is huge, you can read about it, for example, here.

The technology he proposed at that time was used only in the creation of stereoscopic postcards and images, you probably played with them as a child. It can be a calendar card with an iridescent image or a postcard in which a volume effect is created. It is based on exactly the same ideas that Ren Ng used in the development of his camera.

There are now more than a dozen companies that create Light Field cameras, including both research laboratories and commercial enterprises. All these companies are related, except for Lytro, only that they focus on the professional use of their devices, and their cost is measured in tens of thousands of dollars. The technology is still in its infancy and so expensive that there is no need to talk about mass application, although the experience of Lytro would seem to prove the opposite.For example, the German company Raytrix was the first to produce commercial cameras based on Light Field technology. But she initially positioned such products as professional. Indeed, one of the first R11 cameras cost $ 30,000, had a resolution of 3 megapixels. Few ordinary mortals could afford such a toy, it was primarily intended for research laboratories. Unfortunately, it is not possible to find out the sales volume of such cameras, but I bet that this is a few dozen pieces at most.

At the moment, the company has several products, but prices are only available upon request, this is not a mass market. I don't know how the release of Lytro affected Raytrix's business, but suffice it to say that inside these cameras are used NVIDIA's Cuda GPUs, which does not initially mean low cost, these are really professional solutions.

That's why the promises of Lytro have always looked very enticing - an inexpensive camera with Light Field technology, in which you don't need to focus, just point the camera at the object and shoot. A fantasy that promised a huge number of new possibilities and applications. At any rate, that was the picture in the minds of most who read the lengthy brochures of Lytro. And the crazy amount of investments in the company, which exceeded $ 50 million, hinted that this was not an empty bag, but a worthwhile technology that could blow up the market.

My expectations from this product were very high, I specifically admit this, as perhaps the disappointment affected the text you are reading. For a long time I approached the description of the camera from various angles and tried to find bright moments, but each time I came across the fact that all my efforts were in vain. The Lytro camera was disappointing with every shot I took. But first, about what it is.

Extracurricular reading:

Lytro Specifications

The camera fits in the palm of your hand (112x41x41 mm, 214 grams) and is completely different from conventional cameras. Appearance makes an impression on others, they look closely and try to understand what is in your hands. Therefore, Lytro should be given a solid "five" for the image component, they managed to surprise, which in itself is quite a lot in the modern world.

The case is rubberized at the bottom, it is a metal surface at the top. The camera is available so far in three colors - red, blue and dark gray. The last two colors have 8 GB of built-in memory (350 shots), while the red camera has 16 GB (750 shots).

All images are saved in proprietary lpf format and require special software to view them. The camera resolution is 11 megarays, but you can convert any picture to regular JPEG (1080x1080 pixels, that is, this is the maximum camera resolution, not the declared one). In fact, despite the claim of 11 megapixels, the camera's resolution is a modest 1.1 megapixel. I think it's done right from a marketing point of view, as few people will like such a low camera resolution in 2012, when most phones have 5 or 8 megapixels.

The quality of the optics looks great on paper - the lens has a constant f / 2 aperture, and the focal length is from 43 to 340 mm (in terms of a 35 mm frame). The manufacturer does not say anything about ISO values, but the range is from 125 to 3200. You cannot change the ISO value in any way, the camera selects it on its own. The preferred values ​​are ISO 800, as well as 200 and 400. I have not been able to notice other values ​​in real life. It is possible that these are software flaws, but they do not look very nice. To top it off, the electronic shutter works so that any moving objects, such as a dog or a car on a carpet, are out of focus, they are blurred. One of the characteristics that should have been on top in this chamber turned out to be puffy.

Another thing that darkens the life of any Lytro user is the viewfinder, which is built in front of the lens, it is a touch screen with a diagonal of 1.46 inches and a minimum resolution. To see something worthwhile in this viewfinder is not worth even thinking, even the resulting photographs look like a hint of something. It remains to guess what exactly you shot.

Due to the fact that the screen is touch-sensitive, you can view photos on it (there is no need for this), and most importantly, change operating modes. There are only two of them - the default is everyday (Everyday). In this mode, the focal length of the lens is 43-150 mm, you do not need to select the object on which the primary focusing occurs. In Creative mode, the focal length is 43-340mm, you can select the subject you want to focus on. Macro shots are excellent in this mode. Optical zoom 8x.

< td>

The camera turns on almost instantly, it takes seconds. Unfortunately, the magnetic lens cap doesn't attach, so it's easy to lose it. Another disadvantage is that the zoom slider almost always works by accident, you have to return it to its normal position (the upper end is marked with notches on the rubber). The shutter button is right there. At the bottom there is a power button, there is also a microUSB connector for connecting a charger or cable. The built-in battery allows you to take about 350-400 shots, while charging in a car takes about 1.5 hours, from a computer - about 3.5-4 hours.

Unfortunately, Lytro Desktop is required to transfer files to your computer as the file format is only supported by Lytro Desktop. At the moment, there is a version of the program only for MacOS, they promise to release it for Windows later.

Lytro camera review - a failed revolution

I learned about the small company Lytro long before the appearance of the camera of the same name, at that time it was still a small but promising startup Refocus Imaging. In 2006, it was organized by Stanford University researcher Ren Ng. He received his degree the same year he started his own company, where he became president. The camera was called the Light Field Camera and differed in that it allowed not to point the lens at the object, there was no autofocus. The camera recorded light fluxes, the direction of each ray of light and its strength, which made it possible to further focus the image on the computer. Any object and plan could be sharp, just hover over it with the cursor. In conventional photography, the camera measures the strength of the light, its intensity, but not the direction. So, ordinary photography and camera technology is two-dimensional, but in Light Field cameras, a four-dimensional data array is obtained, which then needs to be converted into a two-dimensional image. The transformation itself does not affect the original data of the photo in any way, only the display of the image in a two-dimensional plane changes, you sharpen one or another part of the photo.

Lytro even came up with a name to denote the information in such a photo - megarays (that is, these are not points, but the number of rays - in the first camera the resolution is 11 megarays).

Information about this technology began to appear widely since the end of 2005, all thanks to the efforts of Ren Ng. Although it is fair to say that he is not the inventor of this technology, it was invented in 1908 by Gabriel Lippmann. The story of this man is very interesting, since his contribution to photography is huge, you can read about it, for example, here.

The technology he proposed at that time was used only in the creation of stereoscopic postcards and images, you probably played with them in your childhood. It can be a calendar with an iridescent image or a postcard in which a volume effect is created. It is based on exactly the same ideas that Ren Ng used in the development of his camera.

There are now more than a dozen companies that create Light Field cameras, including both research laboratories and commercial enterprises. All these companies are related, except for Lytro, only that they focus on the professional use of their devices, and their cost is measured in tens of thousands of dollars. The technology is still in its infancy and so expensive that it is not possible to talk about mass application, although the experience of Lytro, it would seem, proves the opposite.For example, the German company Raytrix was the first to produce commercial cameras based on Light Field technology. But she initially positioned such products as professional. Indeed, one of the first R11 cameras cost $ 30,000, had a resolution of 3 megapixels. Few ordinary mortals could afford such a toy, it was primarily intended for research laboratories. Unfortunately, it is not possible to find out the sales volume of such cameras, but I bet that this is a few dozen pieces at most.

At the moment, the company has several products, but prices are only available upon request, this is not a mass market. I don't know how the release of Lytro affected Raytrix's business, but suffice it to say that inside these cameras are used NVIDIA's Cuda GPUs, which does not initially mean low cost, these are really professional solutions.

That's why the promises of Lytro have always looked very enticing - an inexpensive camera with Light Field technology, in which you don't need to focus, just point the camera at the object and shoot. A fantasy that promised a huge number of new possibilities and applications. At any rate, that was the picture in the minds of most who read the lengthy brochures of Lytro. And the crazy amount of investments in the company, which exceeded $ 50 million, hinted that this was not an empty bag, but a worthwhile technology that could blow up the market.

My expectations from this product were very high, I specifically admit this, as perhaps the disappointment affected the text you are reading. For a long time I approached the description of the camera from various angles and tried to find bright moments, but each time I came across the fact that all my efforts were in vain. The Lytro camera was disappointing with every shot I took. But first, about what it is.

Extracurricular reading:

Lytro specifications

The camera fits in the palm of your hand (112x41x41 mm, 214 grams) and is completely different from conventional cameras. The appearance makes an impression on others, they look closely and try to understand what is in your hands. Therefore, Lytro should be given a solid "five" for the image component, they managed to surprise, which in itself is quite a lot in the modern world.

The case is rubberized at the bottom, it is a metal surface at the top. The camera is available so far in three colors - red, blue and dark gray. The last two colors have 8 GB of built-in memory (350 shots), while the red camera has 16 GB (750 shots).

All images are saved in proprietary lpf format and require special software to view them. The camera resolution is 11 megarays, but you can convert any picture to a regular JPEG (1080x1080 pixels, that is, this is the maximum camera resolution, not the declared one). In fact, despite the claim of 11 megapixels, the camera's resolution is a modest 1.1 megapixel. I think it's done right from a marketing point of view, as few people will like such a low camera resolution in 2012, when most phones have 5 or 8 megapixels.

The quality of the optics looks great on paper - the lens has a constant f / 2 aperture, and the focal length is from 43 to 340 mm (in terms of a 35 mm frame). The manufacturer does not say anything about ISO values, but the range is from 125 to 3200. You cannot change the ISO value in any way, the camera selects it on its own. The preferred values ​​are ISO 800, as well as 200 and 400. I have not been able to notice other values ​​in real life. It is possible that these are software flaws, but they do not look very nice. To top it off, the electronic shutter works so that any moving objects, such as a dog or a car on a carpet, are out of focus, they are blurred. One of the characteristics that should have been on top in this chamber turned out to be puffy.

Another point that darkens the life of any Lytro user is the viewfinder, which is built in front of the lens, it is a touch screen with a diagonal of 1.46 inches and a minimum resolution. To see something worthwhile in this viewfinder is not worth even thinking, even the resulting photographs look like a hint of something. It remains to guess what exactly you shot.

Due to the fact that the screen is touch-sensitive, you can view photos on it (there is no need for this), and most importantly, change operating modes. There are only two of them - the default is everyday (Everyday). In this mode, the focal length of the lens is 43-150 mm, you do not need to select the object on which the primary focusing occurs. In Creative mode, the focal length is 43-340mm, you can select the subject you want to focus on. Macro shots are excellent in this mode. Optical zoom 8x.

< td>

The camera turns on almost instantly, it takes seconds. Unfortunately, the magnetic lens cap doesn't attach, so it's easy to lose it. Another disadvantage is that the zoom slider almost always works by accident, you have to return it to its normal position (the upper end is marked with notches on the rubber). The shutter button is right there. At the bottom there is a power button, there is also a microUSB connector for connecting a charger or cable. The built-in battery allows you to take about 350-400 shots, while charging in a car takes about 1.5 hours, from a computer - about 3.5-4 hours.

Unfortunately, Lytro Desktop is required to transfer files to your computer as the file format is only supported by Lytro Desktop. At the moment, there is a version of the program only for MacOS, they promise to release it for Windows later.

Lytro camera review - a failed revolution

I learned about the small company Lytro long before the appearance of the camera of the same name, at that time it was still a small but promising startup Refocus Imaging. In 2006, it was organized by Stanford University researcher Ren Ng. He received his degree the same year he started his own company, where he became president. The camera was called the Light Field Camera and differed in that it allowed not to point the lens at the object, there was no autofocus. The camera recorded light fluxes, the direction of each ray of light and its strength, which made it possible to further focus the image on the computer. Any object and plan could be sharp, just hover over it with the cursor. In conventional photography, the camera measures the strength of the light, its intensity, but not the direction. So, ordinary photography and camera technology is two-dimensional, but in Light Field cameras, a four-dimensional data array is obtained, which then needs to be converted into a two-dimensional image. The transformation itself does not affect the original data of the photo in any way, only the display of the image in a two-dimensional plane changes, you sharpen one or another part of the photo.

Lytro even came up with a name to denote the information in such a photo - megarays (that is, these are not points, but the number of rays - in the first camera the resolution is 11 megarays).

Information about this technology began to appear widely since the end of 2005, all thanks to the efforts of Ren Ng. Although it is fair to say that he is not the inventor of this technology, it was invented in 1908 by Gabriel Lippmann. The story of this man is very interesting, since his contribution to photography is huge, you can read about it, for example, here.

The technology he proposed at that time was used only in the creation of stereoscopic postcards and images, you probably played with them in your childhood. It can be a calendar with an iridescent image or a postcard in which a volume effect is created. It is based on exactly the same ideas that Ren Ng used in the development of his camera.

There are now more than a dozen companies that create Light Field cameras, including both research laboratories and commercial enterprises. All these companies are related, except for Lytro, only that they focus on the professional use of their devices, and their cost is measured in tens of thousands of dollars. The technology is still in its infancy and so expensive that it is not possible to talk about mass application, although the experience of Lytro, it would seem, proves the opposite.For example, the German company Raytrix was the first to produce commercial cameras based on Light Field technology. But she initially positioned such products as professional. Indeed, one of the first R11 cameras cost $ 30,000, had a resolution of 3 megapixels. Few ordinary mortals could afford such a toy, it was primarily intended for research laboratories. Unfortunately, it is not possible to find out the sales volume of such cameras, but I bet that this is a few dozen pieces at most.

At the moment, the company has several products, but prices are only available upon request, this is not a mass market. I don't know how the release of Lytro affected Raytrix's business, but suffice it to say that inside these cameras are used NVIDIA's Cuda GPUs, which does not initially mean low cost, these are really professional solutions.

That's why the promises of Lytro have always looked very enticing - an inexpensive camera with Light Field technology, in which you don't need to focus, just point the camera at the object and shoot. A fantasy that promised a huge number of new possibilities and applications. At any rate, that was the picture in the minds of most who read the lengthy brochures of Lytro. And the crazy amount of investments in the company, which exceeded $ 50 million, hinted that this was not an empty bag, but a worthwhile technology that could blow up the market.

My expectations from this product were very high, I specifically admit this, as perhaps the disappointment affected the text you are reading. For a long time I approached the description of the camera from various angles and tried to find bright moments, but each time I came across the fact that all my efforts were in vain. The Lytro camera was disappointing with every shot I took. But first, about what it is.

Extracurricular reading:

Lytro Specifications

The camera fits in the palm of your hand (112x41x41 mm, 214 grams) and is completely different from conventional cameras. Appearance makes an impression on others, they look closely and try to understand what is in your hands. Therefore, Lytro should be given a solid "five" for the image component, they managed to surprise, which in itself is quite a lot in the modern world.

The case is rubberized at the bottom, it is a metal surface at the top. The camera is available so far in three colors - red, blue and dark gray. The last two colors have 8 GB of built-in memory (350 shots), while the red camera has 16 GB (750 shots).

All images are saved in proprietary lpf format and require special software to view them. The camera resolution is 11 megarays, but you can convert any picture to regular JPEG (1080x1080 pixels, that is, this is the maximum camera resolution, not the declared one). In fact, despite the claim of 11 megapixels, the camera's resolution is a modest 1.1 megapixel. I think it's done right from a marketing point of view, as few people will like such a low camera resolution in 2012, when most phones have 5 or 8 megapixels.

The quality of the optics looks great on paper - the lens has a constant f / 2 aperture, and the focal length is from 43 to 340 mm (in terms of a 35 mm frame). The manufacturer does not say anything about ISO values, but the range is from 125 to 3200. You cannot change the ISO value in any way, the camera selects it on its own. The preferred values ​​are ISO 800, as well as 200 and 400. I have not been able to notice other values ​​in real life. It is possible that these are software flaws, but they do not look very nice. To top it off, the electronic shutter works so that any moving objects, such as a dog or a car on a carpet, are out of focus, they are blurred. One of the characteristics that should have been on top in this chamber turned out to be puffy.

Another thing that darkens the life of any Lytro user is the viewfinder, which is built in front of the lens, it is a touch screen with a diagonal of 1.46 inches and a minimum resolution. To see something worthwhile in this viewfinder is not worth even thinking, even the resulting photographs look like a hint of something. It remains to guess what exactly you shot.

Due to the fact that the screen is touch-sensitive, you can view photos on it (there is no need for this), and most importantly, change operating modes. There are only two of them - the default is everyday (Everyday). In this mode, the focal length of the lens is 43-150 mm, you do not need to select the object on which the primary focusing occurs. In Creative mode, the focal length is 43-340mm, you can select the subject you want to focus on. Macro shots are excellent in this mode. Optical zoom 8x.

< td>

The camera turns on almost instantly, it takes seconds. Unfortunately, the magnetic lens cap doesn't attach, so it's easy to lose it. Another disadvantage is that the zoom slider almost always works by accident, you have to return it to its normal position (the upper end is marked with notches on the rubber). The shutter button is right there. At the bottom there is a power button, there is also a microUSB connector for connecting a charger or cable. The built-in battery allows you to take about 350-400 shots, while charging in a car takes about 1.5 hours, from a computer - about 3.5-4 hours.

Unfortunately, Lytro Desktop is required to transfer files to your computer as the file format is only supported by Lytro Desktop. At the moment, there is a version of the program only for MacOS, they promise to release it for Windows later.

Lytro camera review - a failed revolution

I learned about the small company Lytro long before the appearance of the camera of the same name, at that time it was still a small but promising startup Refocus Imaging. In 2006, it was organized by Stanford University researcher Ren Ng. He received his degree the same year he started his own company, where he became president. The camera was called the Light Field Camera and differed in that it allowed not to point the lens at the object, there was no autofocus. The camera recorded light fluxes, the direction of each ray of light and its strength, which made it possible to further focus the image on the computer. Any object and plan could be sharp, just hover over it with the cursor. In conventional photography, the camera measures the strength of the light, its intensity, but not the direction. So, ordinary photography and camera technology is two-dimensional, but in Light Field cameras, a four-dimensional data array is obtained, which then needs to be converted into a two-dimensional image. The transformation itself does not affect the original data of the photo in any way, only the display of the image in a two-dimensional plane changes, you sharpen one or another part of the photo.

Lytro even came up with a name to denote the information in such a photo - megarays (that is, these are not points, but the number of rays - in the first camera the resolution is 11 megarays).

Information about this technology began to appear widely since the end of 2005, all thanks to the efforts of Ren Ng. Although it is fair to say that he is not the inventor of this technology, it was invented in 1908 by Gabriel Lippmann. The story of this man is very interesting, since his contribution to photography is huge, you can read about it, for example, here.

The technology he proposed at that time was used only in the creation of stereoscopic postcards and images, you probably played with them in your childhood. It can be a calendar with an iridescent image or a postcard in which a volume effect is created. It is based on exactly the same ideas that Ren Ng used in the development of his camera.

There are now more than a dozen companies that create Light Field cameras, including both research laboratories and commercial enterprises. All these companies, with the exception of Lytro, have in common only the fact that they focus on the professional use of their devices, and their cost is measured in tens of thousands of dollars. The technology is still in its infancy and so expensive that it is not possible to talk about mass application, although the experience of Lytro, it would seem, proves the opposite. For example, the German company Raytrix was the first to produce commercial cameras based on Light Field technology. But she initially positioned such products as professional. Indeed, one of the first R11 cameras cost $ 30,000, had a resolution of 3 megapixels. Few ordinary mortals could afford such a toy, it was primarily intended for research laboratories. Unfortunately, it is not possible to find out the sales volume of such cameras, but I bet that this is a few dozen pieces at most.

There are now more than a dozen companies that create Light Field cameras, including both research laboratories and commercial enterprises. Brings all these companies together with the exception of Lytro, only that they focus on professional use of their devices, and their cost is measured in tens of thousands of dollars. The technology is still in its infancy and so expensive that there is no need to talk about mass application, although the experience of Lytro would seem to prove the opposite. For example, the German company Raytrix was the first to produce commercial cameras based on Light Field technology. But she initially positioned such products as professional. Indeed, one of the first R11 cameras cost $ 30,000, had a resolution of 3 megapixels. Few ordinary mortals could afford such a toy, it was primarily intended for research laboratories. Unfortunately, it is not possible to find out the sales volume of such cameras, but I bet that these are several dozen pieces at most.

At the moment, the company has several products, but prices are only available upon request, this is not a mass market. I don't know how the release of Lytro affected Raytrix's business, but suffice it to say that inside these cameras are used NVIDIA's Cuda GPUs, which does not initially mean low cost, these are really professional solutions.

That's why the promises of Lytro have always looked very enticing - an inexpensive camera with Light Field technology, in which you don't need to focus, just point the camera at the object and shoot. A fantasy that promised a huge number of new possibilities and applications. At any rate, that was the picture in the minds of most who read the lengthy brochures of Lytro. And the crazy amount of investments in the company, which exceeded $ 50 million, hinted that this was not an empty bag, but a worthwhile technology that could blow up the market.

My expectations from this product were very high, I specifically admit this, as perhaps the disappointment affected the text you are reading. For a long time I approached the description of the camera from various angles and tried to find bright moments, but each time I came across the fact that all my efforts were in vain. The Lytro camera was disappointing with every shot I took. But first, about what it is.

Extracurricular reading:

Lytro specifications

The camera fits in the palm of your hand (112x41x41 mm, 214 grams) and is completely different from conventional cameras. The appearance makes an impression on others, they look closely and try to understand what is in your hands. Therefore, Lytro should be given a solid "five" for the image component, they managed to surprise, which in itself is quite a lot in the modern world.

The case is rubberized at the bottom, it is a metal surface at the top. The camera is available so far in three colors - red, blue and dark gray. The last two colors have 8 GB of built-in memory (350 shots), while the red camera has 16 GB (750 shots).

All images are saved in proprietary lpf format and require special software to view them. The camera resolution is 11 megarays, but you can convert any picture to a regular JPEG (1080x1080 pixels, that is, this is the maximum camera resolution, not the declared one). In fact, despite the claim of 11 megapixels, the camera's resolution is a modest 1.1 megapixel. I think it's done right from a marketing point of view, as few people will like such a low camera resolution in 2012, when most phones have 5 or 8 megapixels.

The quality of the optics looks great on paper - the lens has a constant f / 2 aperture, and the focal length is from 43 to 340 mm (in terms of a 35 mm frame). The manufacturer does not say anything about ISO values, but the range is from 125 to 3200. You cannot change the ISO value in any way, the camera selects it on its own. The preferred values ​​are ISO 800, as well as 200 and 400. I have not been able to notice other values ​​in real life. It is possible that these are software flaws, but they do not look very nice. To top it off, the electronic shutter works so that any moving objects, such as a dog or a car on a carpet, are out of focus, they are blurred. One of the characteristics that should have been on top in this chamber turned out to be puffy.

Another thing that darkens the life of any Lytro user is the viewfinder, which is built in front of the lens, it is a touch screen with a diagonal of 1.46 inches and a minimum resolution. To see something worthwhile in this viewfinder is not worth even thinking, even the resulting photographs look like a hint of something. It remains to guess what exactly you shot.

Due to the fact that the screen is touch-sensitive, you can view photos on it (there is no need for this), and most importantly, change operating modes. There are only two of them - the default is everyday (Everyday). In this mode, the focal length of the lens is 43-150 mm, you do not need to select the object on which the primary focusing occurs. In Creative mode, the focal length is 43-340mm, you can select the subject you want to focus on. Macro shots are excellent in this mode. Optical zoom 8x.

The camera turns on almost instantly, it takes seconds. Unfortunately, the magnetic lens cap doesn't attach, so it's easy to lose it. Another disadvantage is that the zoom slider almost always works by accident, you have to return it to its normal position (the upper end is marked with notches on the rubber). The shutter button is right there. At the bottom there is a power button, there is also a microUSB connector for connecting a charger or cable. The built-in battery allows you to take about 350-400 shots, while charging in a car takes about 1.5 hours, from a computer - about 3.5-4 hours.

Unfortunately, Lytro Desktop is required to transfer files to your computer as the file format is only supported by Lytro Desktop. At the moment, there is a version of the program only for MacOS, they promise to release it for Windows later.