AKG K27i on-ear headphones review

2007 marks the 60th anniversary of AKG. From the moment the company was founded, the specialists working in it did not exchange for trifles and immediately focused on professional microphones and headphones. In the first post-war years, they were hand-picked by only five people. Today, AKG is part of the giant Harman Corporation and enjoys a deservedly high reputation among all those who work professionally with sound. Like many other well-known professional equipment manufacturers (for example, BeyerDynamic, KOSS or Audio-Technica), in recent years AKG has turned its attention to the consumer electronics market. This is quite understandable, because the professional segment is rather narrow, and the developed technologies can be easily implemented in developments for the mass market.

The company has released several successful models of on-ear headphones, which have gained considerable popularity, including in our country. Recently, in addition to the not outdated and very popular models K24p and K26p, a new headphone model was introduced, which received the K27i index. In all informational materials, the sound quality of this model is especially emphasized; the company, apparently, positions it above its predecessors, as a kind of hi-fi solution for portable audio. These headphones will be discussed.

The AKG K27i are classic, compact on-ear headphones designed for use with a variety of personal audio devices. Of course, with their help, you can, for example, watch TV (especially portable) or, say, play computer games, but headphones are not suitable for other applications, being purely consumer.

The folding design of the headphones deserves special mention, when the speaker cups are folded inside the headband, made of two strips of spring steel moving along the longitudinal axis relative to each other. It is noteworthy that almost the same solution is used in the KOSS Porta Pro headphones, which have been produced for more than 20 years in a row. During this time, they have gained almost cult status and become a certain standard, although it is quite possible that AKG simply licensed technology from a competitor.

Among the features of the AKG K27i, it is worth noting the volume control built into the cable (it cannot be attributed to its advantages, no matter how the manufacturer would like it, why - below), a closed design and a suspension system for cups with several degrees of freedom.

Body and design

At first glance at the K27i, the analogy with the KOSS Porta Pro does not come out of my head, as I talked about in the corresponding episode of the podcast. In addition, the headphone design continues the ideas of the popular predecessors, K24p and K26p, so they immediately come to mind. Looking ahead a little, I will say that the K27i differs from these models not only in design, but also technically, although not too much.

The design of the headphones uses three materials, smooth plastic in gray and white, spring steel and soft leatherette, again in gray. As I noted in the podcast, the gray and white color scheme almost coincidentally matches that of the iPod 5G, and completely: the iPod has a metal back panel, and the K27i has a metal headband. True, the iPod 5G in Russia, and indeed throughout the world, is not as popular as the Shuffle and Nano, and in relation to these models, the “monochrome” days are long gone, and now Apple is releasing them in various colors.

Apart from color analogies, the headphones look pretty decent. The polished metal headband gives the design a catchy, eye-catching look. The combination of white and gray colors is quite successful, although, of course, in relation to headphones it looks rather unusual. On the other hand, it is unlikely that the designers of AKG were striving for the “ordinary” appearance of their headphones. The outer surface of the cups is decorated with a decorative pattern, in the center is the AKG logo. The side surfaces are made ribbed, apparently for greater ease of grip with fingers, and the outer edge is 2-3 millimeters higher than the inner ribs, this is done, apparently, for the same purpose.

The quality of assembly and fit of parts is good, there were no surprises here. The guiding movements of the metal headband strips are made “in the image and likeness” of KOSS Porta Pro, they work reliably and do not show a predisposition to loosening. A slight backlash is still present, but the reason for it, apparently, is not in a poor-quality assembly, but in a technical necessity so that the plates do not get stuck tightly if they happen to be slightly skewed. By the way, the pads made of porous material that protect the scalp from contact with the headband, I first saw it on KOSS Porta Pro, apparently, they are an integral part of the licensed solution. The K27i has smaller and thicker rubbers, but slightly more resilient. I did not notice much difference in the comfort of wearing two headphones, but more about this in the appropriate section.

There are plastic hinges in the places where the cups are attached to the headband. Naturally, they are not as complex as, say, BeyerDynamic DJX-1, they have only one degree of freedom - the hinge (and the earpiece, respectively) moves only in a vertical plane. The horizontal freedom of the cups is provided by special plastic rods, on which the cups are actually attached to the hinges. Of course, the cup cannot be rotated around its axis, but still on the bar it rotates by about 180 degrees, which more than covers all situations that may arise during use. Still, the K27i is a consumer model, and already such "freedom of action" seems to be no small achievement. The company did not fail to note this by calling the technology 3D-axis and placing its separate logo on the box. However, in my opinion, the rods look too fragile, unless, of course, they contain a metal rod inside, so you will have to handle the headphones with extra care.

The inner surface of the cups is flat, with concentric holes for the passage of sound waves. You can see it if you remove the ear pads. The latter are made of soft gray leatherette and have a dual function. First of all, the ear cushions, which do not even completely cover the auricle, provide tangible sound isolation, although, of course, its level does not reach the level of large monitor headphones.

The second function can be called external soundproofing. If we compare the K27i with the same Porta Pro, then the closed design of the headphones themselves and the presence of ear cushions (the KOSS product has only foam pads on the cups) are not in full size, but still relieves the ears of others from the sounds of music in the headphones. Surely all our readers have experienced one way or another annoyance from the “clattering” sounds coming from the headphones of nearby public transport passengers. In the case of K27i, a significant part of them "remains inside" and does not bother anyone.

The appearance of the headphones is more or less universal, it can be combined with almost any style of clothing, although it looks quite bright. However, in my opinion, K27i look much better than the same gray-orange K24p, which would look ridiculous, say, on the head of an adult in a business suit. Although, of course, these are all conventions, and if this very person feels that he likes these headphones, why not wear them, diluting the overall strict look.

Sound, usability

If a company has been producing headphones for decades and is still among the market leaders, the most respected brands, then one should not expect low-quality sound from its products, even consumer products. The K27i does not disappoint here and holds the company's brand well. However, on the box with the headphones it is written that they are premium-class foldable mini-headphones, and this same premium-class willy-nilly will have to be confirmed. During testing, we listened to headphones with iPod 5G and Cowon F2 players on a wide variety of musical material, from jazz to techno, although, of course, dance music prevailed. For greater authenticity of the listening experience, any schemes for improving the sound on the players were turned off.

I will not delay, in terms of sound, the headphones showed themselves on the good side and showed very good results. The presence of dense ear cushions improves the sound of low frequencies. For example, in KOSS Porta Pro, which are considered the standard in this part, a considerable part of the bass is lost due to the semi-open design of the headphones and the lack of ear cushions, which are replaced by a regular foam pad. The bass performance of the K27i is as good as can be for headphones of this design and size. Perhaps I would even call them "bass". At low volume levels, the bass response is very similar to the Porta Pro with their deep soft bass. But as the volume is raised, the bass is not cut off, just the emphasis is shifted to slightly less low frequencies, resulting in a noticeable bass kick, which is what is needed for dance and any other music rich in bass. Medium and high frequencies are reproduced without blockages and bursts, and, importantly, at a volume level close to the maximum, high frequencies do not hurt the ear. The overload capacity of the headphones can also be praised: if the bass is not artificially “lifted up” on the player, then the K27i can easily withstand the volume of about 90-95% on far from the quietest iPod 5G and Cowon F2. At the same time, there are no distortions audible to the ear.

In terms of wearing comfort, the headphones are broadly the same as the KOSS Porta Pro. After “installing” the K27i on the head, the headphones sit tight and do not move during sudden movements, however, in order to put them in place, you need to try if the headband arcs “forgot” their position and moved relative to each other. There is nothing complicated about this Rolls-royce , it's just that the process is somewhat different from the usual, because ordinary headphones, as a rule, , you can once adjust "for yourself" along the length of the headband and never remember it again, or quickly push the cups to the desired length, focusing on the risks.

The pads that prevent contact of the scalp with the metal of the headband, despite their reduced size, cope with the task and do not remind of themselves during wearing. Fitted to the size of the headphones sit tight, but do not put pressure on the ears or head, there is no tangible discomfort. The weight of the headphones is also small, the head does not get tired of them, it is easy to forget about the headphones, immersed in music. By the way, in heavy traffic, I would not recommend using them, because the sound insulation is still decent, there is a chance not to hear a warning signal. But for the subway, trips and flights, the K27i is very suitable.

The K27i has another feature that I forgot about, which is no wonder: it's a volume control built into the cable. Personally, I am suspicious of passive volume controls, because they often "eat off" a decent part of the signal, the level of which is intended to be regulated. Actually, there is nothing special in the regulator. This is a regular miniature slider with a stroke of only about a centimeter. Frankly, I do not know anyone who would use such controls, but perhaps it will come in handy for someone, especially if the headphone owner will carry the player, say, in a backpack.

Conclusions and impressions

Excellent sound and noise isolation, nice design, good workmanship are the main features of the AKG K27i. True, it was not without a “fly in the ointment”: the swivel rods look fragile, and in order to quickly and accurately put on the headphones, you will have to get used to their design for some time. On the whole, the K27i seems to be a very good on-ear headphone for the player and should be suitable for those for whom in-ear headphones are too small, and monitor ones are too big.

AKG K27i on-ear headphones review

2007 marks the 60th anniversary of AKG. From the moment the company was founded, the specialists working in it did not exchange for trifles and immediately focused on professional microphones and headphones. In the first post-war years, they were hand-picked by only five people. Today, AKG is part of the giant Harman Corporation and enjoys a deservedly high reputation among all those who work professionally with sound. Like many other well-known professional equipment manufacturers (for example, BeyerDynamic, KOSS or Audio-Technica), in recent years AKG has turned its attention to the consumer electronics market. This is quite understandable, because the professional segment is rather narrow, and the developed technologies can be easily implemented in developments for the mass market.

The company has released several successful models of on-ear headphones, which have gained considerable popularity, including in our country. Recently, in addition to the not outdated and very popular models K24p and K26p, a new headphone model was introduced, which received the K27i index. In all informational materials, the sound quality of this model is especially emphasized; the company, apparently, positions it above its predecessors, as a kind of hi-fi solution for portable audio. These headphones will be discussed.

The AKG K27i are classic, compact on-ear headphones designed for use with a variety of personal audio devices. Of course, with their help, you can, for example, watch TV (especially portable) or, say, play computer games, but headphones are not suitable for other applications, being purely consumer.

The folding design of the headphones deserves special mention, when the speaker cups are folded inside the headband, made of two strips of spring steel moving along the longitudinal axis relative to each other. It is noteworthy that almost the same solution is used in the KOSS Porta Pro headphones, which have been produced for more than 20 years in a row. During this time, they have gained almost cult status and become a certain standard, although it is quite possible that AKG simply licensed technology from a competitor.

Among the features of the AKG K27i, it is worth noting the volume control built into the cable (it cannot be attributed to its advantages, no matter how the manufacturer would like it, why - below), a closed design and a suspension system for cups with several degrees of freedom.

Body and design

At first glance at the K27i, the analogy with the KOSS Porta Pro does not come out of my head, as I talked about in the corresponding episode of the podcast. In addition, the headphone design continues the ideas of the popular predecessors, K24p and K26p, so they immediately come to mind. Looking ahead a little, I will say that the K27i differs from these models not only in design, but also technically, although not too much.

The design of the headphones uses three materials, smooth plastic in gray and white, spring steel and soft leatherette, again in gray. As I noted in the podcast, the gray and white color scheme almost coincidentally matches that of the iPod 5G, and completely: the iPod has a metal back panel, and the K27i has a metal headband. True, the iPod 5G in Russia, and indeed throughout the world, is not as popular as the Shuffle and Nano, and in relation to these models, the “monochrome” days are long gone, and now Apple is releasing them in various colors.

Apart from color analogies, the headphones look pretty decent. The polished metal headband gives the design a catchy, eye-catching look. The combination of white and gray colors is quite successful, although, of course, in relation to headphones it looks rather unusual. On the other hand, it is unlikely that AKG designers were striving for the "common" appearance of their headphones. The outer surface of the cups is decorated with a decorative pattern, in the center is the AKG logo. The side surfaces are made ribbed, apparently for greater ease of grip with fingers, and the outer edge is 2-3 millimeters higher than the inner ribs, this is done, apparently, for the same purpose.

The quality of assembly and fit of parts is good, there were no surprises here. The guiding movements of the metal headband strips are made “in the image and likeness” of KOSS Porta Pro, they work reliably and do not show a predisposition to loosening. A slight backlash is still present, but the reason for it, apparently, is not in a poor-quality assembly, but in a technical necessity so that the plates do not get stuck tightly if they happen to be slightly skewed. By the way, the pads made of porous material that protect the scalp from contact with the headband, I first saw it on KOSS Porta Pro, apparently, they are an integral part of the licensed solution. The K27i has smaller and thicker rubbers, but slightly more resilient. I did not notice much difference in the comfort of wearing two headphones, but more about this in the appropriate section.

There are plastic hinges in the places where the cups are attached to the headband. Naturally, they are not as complex as, say, BeyerDynamic DJX-1, they have only one degree of freedom - the hinge (and the earpiece, respectively) moves only in a vertical plane. The horizontal freedom of the cups is provided by special plastic rods, on which the cups are actually attached to the hinges. Of course, the cup cannot be rotated around its axis, but still on the bar it rotates by about 180 degrees, which more than covers all situations that may arise during use. Still, the K27i is a consumer model, and already such "freedom of action" seems to be no small achievement. The company did not fail to note this by calling the technology 3D-axis and placing its separate logo on the box. However, in my opinion, the rods look too fragile, unless, of course, they contain a metal rod inside, so you will have to handle the headphones with extra care.

The inner surface of the cups is flat, with concentric holes for the passage of sound waves. You can see it if you remove the ear pads. The latter are made of soft gray leatherette and have a dual function. First of all, the ear cushions, which do not even completely cover the auricle, provide tangible sound isolation, although, of course, its level does not reach the level of large monitor headphones.

The second function can be called external soundproofing. If we compare the K27i with the same Porta Pro, then the closed design of the headphones themselves and the presence of ear cushions (the KOSS product has only foam pads on the cups) are not in full size, but still relieves the ears of others from the sounds of music in the headphones. Surely all our readers have experienced one way or another annoyance from the “clattering” sounds coming from the headphones of nearby public transport passengers. In the case of K27i, a significant part of them "remains inside" and does not bother anyone.

The appearance of the headphones is more or less universal, it can be combined with almost any style of clothing, although it looks quite bright. However, in my opinion, K27i look much better than the same gray-orange K24p, which would look ridiculous, say, on the head of an adult in a business suit. Although, of course, these are all conventions, and if this very person feels that he likes these headphones, why not wear them, diluting the overall strict look.

Sound, usability

If a company has been producing headphones for decades and is still among the market leaders, the most respected brands, then one should not expect low-quality sound from its products, even consumer products. The K27i does not disappoint here and holds the company's brand well. However, on the box with the headphones it is written that they are premium-class foldable mini-headphones, and this same premium-class willy-nilly will have to be confirmed. During testing, we listened to headphones with iPod 5G and Cowon F2 players on a wide variety of musical material, from jazz to techno, although, of course, dance music prevailed. For greater authenticity of the listening experience, any schemes for improving the sound on the players were turned off.

I will not delay, in terms of sound, the headphones showed themselves on the good side and showed very good results. The presence of dense ear cushions improves the sound of low frequencies. For example, in KOSS Porta Pro, which are considered the standard in this part, a considerable part of the bass is lost due to the semi-open design of the headphones and the lack of ear cushions, which are replaced by a regular foam pad. The bass performance of the K27i is as good as can be for headphones of this design and size. Perhaps I would even call them "bass". At low volume levels, the bass response is very similar to the Porta Pro with their deep soft bass. But as the volume is raised, the bass is not cut off, just the emphasis is shifted to slightly less low frequencies, resulting in a noticeable bass kick, which is what is needed for dance and any other music rich in bass. Medium and high frequencies are reproduced without blockages and bursts, and, importantly, at a volume level close to the maximum, high frequencies do not hurt the ear. The overload capacity of the headphones can also be praised: if the bass is not artificially “lifted up” on the player, then the K27i can easily withstand the volume of about 90-95% on far from the quietest iPod 5G and Cowon F2. At the same time, there are no distortions audible to the ear.

In terms of wearing comfort, the headphones are broadly the same as the KOSS Porta Pro. After “installing” the K27i on the head, the headphones sit tight and do not move during sudden movements, however, in order to put them in place, you need to try if the headband arcs “forgot” their position and moved relative to each other. There is nothing complicated about this Rolls-royce , it's just that the process is somewhat different from the usual, because ordinary headphones, as a rule, , you can once adjust "for yourself" along the length of the headband and never remember it again, or quickly push the cups to the desired length, focusing on the risks.

The pads that prevent contact of the scalp with the metal of the headband, despite their reduced size, cope with the task and do not remind of themselves during wearing. Fitted to the size of the headphones sit tight, but do not put pressure on the ears or head, there is no tangible discomfort. The weight of the headphones is also small, the head does not get tired of them, it is easy to forget about the headphones, immersed in music. By the way, in heavy traffic, I would not recommend using them, because the sound insulation is still decent, there is a chance not to hear a warning signal. But for the subway, trips and flights, the K27i is very suitable.

The K27i has another feature that I forgot about, which is no wonder: it's a volume control built into the cable. Personally, I am suspicious of passive volume controls, because they often "eat off" a decent part of the signal, the level of which is intended to be regulated. Actually, there is nothing special in the regulator. This is a regular miniature slider with a stroke of only about a centimeter. Frankly, I do not know anyone who would use such controls, but perhaps it will come in handy for someone, especially if the headphone owner will carry the player, say, in a backpack.

Conclusions and impressions

Excellent sound and noise isolation, nice design, good workmanship are the main features of the AKG K27i. True, it was not without a “fly in the ointment”: the swivel rods look fragile, and in order to quickly and accurately put on the headphones, you will have to get used to their design for some time. On the whole, the K27i seem to be quite good on-ear headphones for the player and should be suitable for those for whom in-ear headphones are too small, and monitor ones are too big.

AKG K27i on-ear headphones review

2007 marks the 60th anniversary of AKG. From the moment the company was founded, the specialists working in it did not exchange for trifles and immediately focused on professional microphones and headphones. In the first post-war years, they were hand-picked by only five people. Today, AKG is part of the giant Harman Corporation and enjoys a deservedly high reputation among all those who work professionally with sound. Like many other well-known professional equipment manufacturers (for example, BeyerDynamic, KOSS or Audio-Technica), in recent years AKG has turned its attention to the consumer electronics market. This is quite understandable, because the professional segment is rather narrow, and the developed technologies can be easily implemented in developments for the mass market.

The company has released several successful models of on-ear headphones, which have gained considerable popularity, including in our country. Recently, in addition to the not outdated and very popular models K24p and K26p, a new headphone model was introduced, which received the K27i index. In all informational materials, the sound quality of this model is especially emphasized; the company, apparently, positions it above its predecessors, as a kind of hi-fi solution for portable audio. These headphones will be discussed.

The AKG K27i are classic, compact on-ear headphones designed for use with a variety of personal audio devices. Of course, with their help, you can, for example, watch TV (especially portable) or, say, play computer games, but headphones are not suitable for other applications, being purely consumer.

The folding design of the headphones deserves special mention, when the speaker cups are folded inside the headband, made of two strips of spring steel moving along the longitudinal axis relative to each other. It is noteworthy that almost the same solution is used in the KOSS Porta Pro headphones, which have been produced for more than 20 years in a row. During this time, they have gained almost cult status and become a certain standard, although it is quite possible that AKG simply licensed technology from a competitor.

Among the features of the AKG K27i, it is worth noting the volume control built into the cable (it cannot be attributed to its advantages, no matter how the manufacturer would like it, why - below), a closed design and a suspension system for cups with several degrees of freedom.

Body and design

At first glance at the K27i, the analogy with the KOSS Porta Pro does not come out of my head, as I talked about in the corresponding episode of the podcast. In addition, the headphone design continues the ideas of the popular predecessors, K24p and K26p, so they immediately come to mind. Looking ahead a little, I will say that the K27i differs from these models not only in design, but also technically, although not too much.

The design of the headphones uses three materials, smooth plastic in gray and white, spring steel and soft leatherette, again in gray. As I noted in the podcast, the gray and white color scheme almost coincidentally matches that of the iPod 5G, and completely: the iPod has a metal back panel, and the K27i has a metal headband. True, the iPod 5G in Russia, and indeed throughout the world, is not as popular as the Shuffle and Nano, and in relation to these models, the “monochrome” days are long gone, and now Apple is releasing them in various colors.

Apart from color analogies, the headphones look pretty decent. The polished metal headband gives the design a catchy, eye-catching look. The combination of white and gray colors is quite successful, although, of course, in relation to headphones it looks rather unusual. On the other hand, it is unlikely that AKG designers were striving for the "common" appearance of their headphones. The outer surface of the cups is decorated with a decorative pattern, in the center is the AKG logo. The side surfaces are made ribbed, apparently for greater ease of grip with fingers, and the outer edge is 2-3 millimeters higher than the inner ribs, this is done, apparently, for the same purpose.

The quality of assembly and fit of parts is good, there were no surprises here. The guiding movements of the metal headband strips are made “in the image and likeness” of KOSS Porta Pro, they work reliably and do not show a predisposition to loosening. A slight backlash is still present, but the reason for it, apparently, is not in a poor-quality assembly, but in a technical necessity so that the plates do not get stuck tightly if they happen to be slightly skewed. By the way, the pads made of porous material that protect the scalp from contact with the headband, I first saw it on KOSS Porta Pro, apparently, they are an integral part of the licensed solution. The K27i has smaller and thicker rubbers, but slightly more resilient. I did not notice much difference in the comfort of wearing two headphones, but more about this in the appropriate section.

There are plastic hinges in the places where the cups are attached to the headband. Naturally, they are not as complex as, say, BeyerDynamic DJX-1, they have only one degree of freedom - the hinge (and the earpiece, respectively) moves only in a vertical plane. The horizontal freedom of the cups is provided by special plastic rods, on which the cups are actually attached to the hinges. Of course, the cup cannot be rotated around its axis, but still on the bar it rotates by about 180 degrees, which more than covers all situations that may arise during use. Still, the K27i is a consumer model, and already such "freedom of action" seems to be no small achievement. The company did not fail to note this by calling the technology 3D-axis and placing its separate logo on the box. However, in my opinion, the rods look too fragile, unless, of course, they contain a metal rod inside, so you will have to handle the headphones with extra care.

The inner surface of the cups is flat, with concentric holes for the passage of sound waves. You can see it if you remove the ear pads. The latter are made of soft gray leatherette and have a dual function. First of all, the ear cushions, which do not even completely cover the auricle, provide tangible sound isolation, although, of course, its level does not reach the level of large monitor headphones.

The second function can be called external soundproofing. If we compare the K27i with the same Porta Pro, then the closed design of the headphones themselves and the presence of ear cushions (the KOSS product has only foam pads on the cups) are not in full size, but still relieves the ears of others from the sounds of music in the headphones. Surely all our readers have experienced one way or another annoyance from the “clattering” sounds coming from the headphones of nearby public transport passengers. In the case of K27i, a significant part of them "remains inside" and does not bother anyone.

The appearance of the headphones is more or less universal, it can be combined with almost any style of clothing, although it looks quite bright. However, in my opinion, K27i look much better than the same gray-orange K24p, which would look ridiculous, say, on the head of an adult in a business suit. Although, of course, these are all conventions, and if this very person feels that he likes these headphones, why not wear them, diluting the overall strict look.

Sound, usability

If a company has been producing headphones for decades and is still among the market leaders, the most respected brands, then one should not expect low-quality sound from its products, even consumer products. The K27i does not disappoint here and holds the company's brand well. However, on the box with the headphones it is written that they are premium-class foldable mini-headphones, and this same premium-class willy-nilly will have to be confirmed. During testing, we listened to headphones with iPod 5G and Cowon F2 players on a wide variety of musical material, from jazz to techno, although, of course, dance music prevailed. For greater authenticity of the listening experience, any schemes for improving the sound on the players were turned off.

I will not delay, in terms of sound, the headphones showed themselves on the good side and showed very good results. The presence of dense ear cushions improves the sound of low frequencies. For example, in KOSS Porta Pro, which are considered the standard in this part, a considerable part of the bass is lost due to the semi-open design of the headphones and the lack of ear cushions, which are replaced by a regular foam pad. The bass performance of the K27i is as good as can be for headphones of this design and size. Perhaps I would even call them "bass". At low volume levels, the bass response is very similar to the Porta Pro with their deep soft bass. But as the volume is raised, the bass is not cut off, just the emphasis is shifted to slightly less low frequencies, resulting in a noticeable bass kick, which is what is needed for dance and any other music rich in bass. Medium and high frequencies are reproduced without blockages and bursts, and, importantly, at a volume level close to the maximum, high frequencies do not hurt the ear. The overload capacity of the headphones can also be praised: if the bass is not artificially “lifted up” on the player, then the K27i can easily withstand the volume of about 90-95% on far from the quietest iPod 5G and Cowon F2. At the same time, there are no distortions audible to the ear.

In terms of wearing comfort, the headphones are broadly the same as the KOSS Porta Pro. After “installing” the K27i on the head, the headphones sit tight and do not move during sudden movements, however, in order to put them in place, you need to try if the headband arcs “forgot” their position and moved relative to each other. There is nothing complicated about this Rolls-royce , it's just that the process is somewhat different from the usual, because ordinary headphones, as a rule, , you can once adjust "for yourself" along the length of the headband and never remember it again, or quickly push the cups to the desired length, focusing on the risks.

The pads that prevent contact of the scalp with the metal of the headband, despite their reduced size, cope with the task and do not remind of themselves during wearing. Fitted to the size of the headphones sit tight, but do not put pressure on the ears or head, there is no tangible discomfort. The weight of the headphones is also small, the head does not get tired of them, it is easy to forget about the headphones, immersed in music. By the way, in heavy traffic, I would not recommend using them, because the sound insulation is still decent, there is a chance not to hear a warning signal. But for the subway, trips and flights, the K27i is very suitable.

The K27i has another feature that I forgot about, which is no wonder: it's a volume control built into the cable. Personally, I am suspicious of passive volume controls, because they often "eat off" a decent part of the signal, the level of which is intended to be regulated. Actually, there is nothing special in the regulator. This is a regular miniature slider with a stroke of only about a centimeter. Frankly, I do not know anyone who would use such controls, but perhaps it will come in handy for someone, especially if the headphone owner will carry the player, say, in a backpack.

Conclusions and impressions

Excellent sound and noise isolation, nice design, good workmanship are the main features of the AKG K27i. True, it was not without a “fly in the ointment”: the swivel rods look fragile, and in order to quickly and accurately put on the headphones, you will have to get used to their design for some time. On the whole, the K27i seem to be quite good on-ear headphones for the player and should be suitable for those for whom in-ear headphones are too small, and monitor ones are too big.

AKG K27i on-ear headphones review

2007 marks the 60th anniversary of AKG. From the moment the company was founded, the specialists working in it did not exchange for trifles and immediately focused on professional microphones and headphones. In the first post-war years, they were hand-picked by only five people. Today, AKG is part of the giant Harman Corporation and enjoys a deservedly high reputation among all those who work professionally with sound. Like many other well-known professional equipment manufacturers (for example, BeyerDynamic, KOSS or Audio-Technica), in recent years AKG has turned its attention to the consumer electronics market. This is quite understandable, because the professional segment is rather narrow, and the developed technologies can be easily implemented in developments for the mass market.

The company has released several successful models of on-ear headphones, which have gained considerable popularity, including in our country. Recently, in addition to the not outdated and very popular models K24p and K26p, a new headphone model was introduced, which received the K27i index. In all informational materials, the sound quality of this model is especially emphasized; the company, apparently, positions it above its predecessors, as a kind of hi-fi solution for portable audio. These headphones will be discussed.

The AKG K27i are classic, compact on-ear headphones designed for use with a variety of personal audio devices. Of course, with their help, you can, for example, watch TV (especially portable) or, say, play computer games, but headphones are not suitable for other applications, being purely consumer.

The folding design of the headphones deserves special mention, when the speaker cups are folded inside the headband, made of two strips of spring steel moving along the longitudinal axis relative to each other. It is noteworthy that almost the same solution is used in the KOSS Porta Pro headphones, which have been produced for more than 20 years in a row. During this time, they have gained almost cult status and become a certain standard, although it is quite possible that AKG simply licensed technology from a competitor.

Among the features of the AKG K27i, it is worth noting the volume control built into the cable (it cannot be attributed to its advantages, no matter how the manufacturer would like it, why - below), a closed design and a suspension system for cups with several degrees of freedom.

Body and design

At first glance at the K27i, the analogy with the KOSS Porta Pro does not come out of my head, as I talked about in the corresponding episode of the podcast. In addition, the headphone design continues the ideas of the popular predecessors, K24p and K26p, so they immediately come to mind. Looking ahead a little, I will say that the K27i differs from these models not only in design, but also technically, although not too much.

The design of the headphones uses three materials, smooth plastic in gray and white, spring steel and soft leatherette, again in gray. As I noted in the podcast, the gray and white color scheme almost coincidentally matches that of the iPod 5G, and completely: the iPod has a metal back panel, and the K27i has a metal headband. True, the iPod 5G in Russia, and indeed throughout the world, is not as popular as the Shuffle and Nano, and in relation to these models, the “monochrome” days are long gone, and now Apple is releasing them in various colors.

Apart from color analogies, the headphones look pretty decent. The polished metal headband gives the design a catchy, eye-catching look. The combination of white and gray colors is quite successful, although, of course, in relation to headphones it looks rather unusual. On the other hand, it is unlikely that the designers of AKG were striving for the “ordinary” appearance of their headphones. The outer surface of the cups is decorated with a decorative pattern, in the center is the AKG logo. The side surfaces are made ribbed, apparently for greater ease of grip with fingers, and the outer edge is 2-3 millimeters higher than the inner ribs, this is done, apparently, for the same purpose.

The quality of assembly and fit of parts is good, there were no surprises here. The guiding movements of the metal headband strips are made “in the image and likeness” of KOSS Porta Pro, they work reliably and do not show a predisposition to loosening. A slight backlash is still present, but the reason for it, apparently, is not in a poor-quality assembly, but in a technical necessity so that the plates do not get stuck tightly if they happen to be slightly skewed. By the way, the pads made of porous material that protect the scalp from contact with the headband, I first saw it on KOSS Porta Pro, apparently, they are an integral part of the licensed solution. The K27i has smaller and thicker rubbers, but slightly more resilient. I did not notice much difference in the comfort of wearing two headphones, but more about this in the appropriate section.

There are plastic hinges in the places where the cups are attached to the headband. Naturally, they are not as complex as, say, BeyerDynamic DJX-1, they have only one degree of freedom - the hinge (and the earpiece, respectively) moves only in a vertical plane. The horizontal freedom of the cups is provided by special plastic rods, on which the cups are actually attached to the hinges. Of course, the cup cannot be rotated around its axis, but still on the bar it rotates by about 180 degrees, which more than covers all situations that may arise during use. Still, the K27i is a consumer model, and already such "freedom of action" seems to be no small achievement. The company did not fail to note this by calling the technology 3D-axis and placing its separate logo on the box. However, in my opinion, the rods look too fragile, unless, of course, they contain a metal rod inside, so you will have to handle the headphones with extra care.

The inner surface of the cups is flat, with concentric holes for the passage of sound waves. You can see it if you remove the ear pads. The latter are made of soft gray leatherette and have a dual function. First of all, the ear cushions, which do not even completely cover the auricle, provide tangible sound isolation, although, of course, its level does not reach the level of large monitor headphones.

The second function can be called external soundproofing. If we compare the K27i with the same Porta Pro, then the closed design of the headphones themselves and the presence of ear cushions (the KOSS product has only foam pads on the cups) are not in full size, but still relieves the ears of others from the sounds of music in the headphones. Surely all our readers have experienced one way or another annoyance from the “clattering” sounds coming from the headphones of nearby public transport passengers. In the case of K27i, a significant part of them "remains inside" and does not bother anyone.

The appearance of the headphones is more or less universal, it can be combined with almost any style of clothing, although it looks quite bright. However, in my opinion, K27i look much better than the same gray-orange K24p, which would look ridiculous, say, on the head of an adult in a business suit. Although, of course, these are all conventions, and if this very person feels that he likes these headphones, why not wear them, diluting the overall strict look.

Sound, usability

If a company has been producing headphones for decades and is still among the market leaders, the most respected brands, then one should not expect low-quality sound from its products, even consumer products. The K27i does not disappoint here and holds the company's brand well. However, on the box with the headphones it is written that they are premium-class foldable mini-headphones, and this same premium-class, willy-nilly, will have to be confirmed. During testing, we listened to headphones with iPod 5G and Cowon F2 players on a wide variety of musical material, from jazz to techno, although, of course, dance music prevailed. For greater authenticity of the listening experience, any sound enhancement schemes on the players were turned off.

I will not delay, in terms of sound, the headphones showed themselves on the good side and showed very good results. The presence of dense ear cushions improves the sound of low frequencies. For example, in KOSS Porta Pro, which are considered the standard in this part, a considerable part of the bass is lost due to the semi-open design of the headphones and the lack of ear cushions, which are replaced by a regular foam pad. The bass performance of the K27i is as good as can be for headphones of this design and size. Perhaps I would even call them "bass". At low volume levels, the bass response is very similar to the Porta Pro with their deep soft bass.But as the volume is raised, the bass is not cut off, just the emphasis is shifted to slightly less low frequencies, resulting in a noticeable bass kick, which is what is needed for dance and any other music rich in bass. Medium and high frequencies are reproduced without blockages and bursts, and, importantly, at a volume level close to the maximum, high frequencies do not hurt the ear. The overload capacity of the headphones can also be praised: if the bass is not artificially “lifted up” on the player, then the K27i can easily withstand the volume of about 90-95% on far from the quietest iPod 5G and Cowon F2. At the same time, there are no distortions audible to the ear.

In terms of wearing comfort, the headphones are broadly the same as the KOSS Porta Pro. After “installing” the K27i on the head, the headphones sit tight and do not move during sudden movements, however, in order to put them in place, you need to try if the headband arcs “forgot” their position and moved relative to each other. There is nothing complicated about this Rolls-Royce, it’s just that the process is somewhat different from the usual one, because ordinary headphones, as a rule, can be adjusted once “for themselves” along the length of the headband and no longer remember it, or quickly push the cups to the desired length, guided by risks.

In terms of wearing comfort, the earphones are generally the same as the KOSS Porta Pro. After “installing” the K27i on the head, the headphones sit tight and do not move during sudden movements, however, in order to put them in place, you need to try if the headband arcs “forgot” their position and moved relative to each other. Nothing complicated about it Rolls-royce Rolls Royce no, it’s just that the process is somewhat different from the usual one, because ordinary headphones, as a rule, can be adjusted once “for themselves” along the length of the headband and no longer remember it, or quickly push the cups to the desired length, focusing on the risks.

The pads that prevent contact of the scalp with the metal of the headband, despite their reduced size, cope with the task and do not remind of themselves during wearing. Fitted to the size of the headphones sit tight, but do not put pressure on the ears or head, there is no tangible discomfort. The weight of the headphones is also small, the head does not get tired of them, it is easy to forget about the headphones, immersed in music. By the way, in heavy traffic, I would not recommend using them, because the sound insulation is still decent, there is a chance not to hear a warning signal. But for the subway, trips and flights, the K27i is very suitable.

The K27i has another feature that I forgot about, which is no wonder: it's a volume control built into the cable. Personally, I am suspicious of passive volume controls, because they often "eat off" a decent part of the signal, the level of which is intended to be regulated. Actually, there is nothing special in the regulator. This is a regular miniature slider with a stroke of only about a centimeter. Frankly, I do not know anyone who would use such controls, but perhaps it will come in handy for someone, especially if the headphone owner will carry the player, say, in a backpack.

Conclusions and impressions

Excellent sound and noise isolation, nice design, good workmanship are the main features of the AKG K27i. True, it was not without a “fly in the ointment”: the swivel rods look fragile, and in order to quickly and accurately put on the headphones, you will have to get used to their design for some time. On the whole, the K27i seem to be quite good on-ear headphones for the player and should be suitable for those for whom in-ear headphones are too small, and monitor ones are too big.